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Searched for this could not find anything here. Does anyone know how to get a brown patina on copper? I tried liver of Sulphur, but that comes up black not brown. I am trying to match that old brown copper patina you see on antique copper bowls and such. The knife I an trying to match to is roughly 19th Century. No green in sight on it, just a soft brown.

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12 minutes ago, mross said:

Searched for this could not find anything here. Does anyone know how to get a brown patina on copper? I tried liver of Sulphur, but that comes up black not brown. I am trying to match that old brown copper patina you see on antique copper bowls and such. The knife I an trying to match to is roughly 19th Century. No green in sight on it, just a soft brown.

Baldwin's patina..... https://www.reactivemetals.com/patinas-chemicals

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I use BirchwoodCasey Super Blue (cold gun bluing) for a nice, easy brown color on clean copper, applied at room temperature with an ear bud. Assuming you’re in the USA, most gun dealers carry it. Note SUPER Blue...they have just plain Blue as well, not what you want. 

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Were you using the liver of sulphur right out of the bottle?  If so, try diluting it with just a couple of drops in a small dish of water.  This slows the reaction down so you have time to catch the brown color before it goes to black.  At least it does with the bronze alloy I have used.

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I was using the Sulphur in about a teaspoon in 8 ounces of hot water. I dipped it in and pulled it out,  it was black almost immediately. I can add more water and go cold and see what happens. The directions said the hot water makes the reaction better, that may not be what I want. Thanks for the suggestions I'll give them a try to get the color match I want. Love this place.

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I probably only use 2 or 3 drops in that same amount of water.  The reaction still happens quickly, but controllably.  

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