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Pattern welded spring scissors


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I had a small piece of low layer count 1095/15N20 leftover from a knife I made years ago. I squared it up, twisted it, and forged this scissors. My scissors usually have a cutting edge welded onto a mild steel body, so this one presented some problems for me. It took a lot of force to align the blades. I tried to keep the shanks out of the quench, but I don't think I was entirely successful.

 

I sharpened the blades before etching, but the edge is pretty rough after. I decided to post pictures of it like this because it shows the contact point between the two blades. There's a bright line along both edges where the two blades are rubbing on each other. It still cuts paper but not a plastic grocery bag. The fact that there's no bright line or scratch marks anywhere else is a good thing. The blades should contact each other at only one point along the edge.

 

There's a discoloration of the etch on one blade that I don't understand. I haven't done a lot of damascus, but I'm wondering if that's a remnant of the heat treat.

 

Here are some technical details. The blades are ground on the inside with an 8” diameter contact wheel. That creates the clearance for the cutting edge. I grind that to 400 grit. On this pair there is only one bevel on the outside. It's ground at about 35 degrees, leaving 55 degree included angle on the blade. I sharpen that on diamond stones by first laying the inside flat on the stone and honing a flat that leaves a thin line around the perimeter of the blade known as the 'ride'. Once I have the ride, I hone the outside bevel, then back and forth with finer stones.

 

I'm planning to do more pattern welding, but not with high carbon alloys. I plan to weld nickel and 1018 so I can get patterns without the hardness. I've been reading the pertinent posts about welding nickel, but I'd welcome any advice.

 

This is a video I watched obsessively as I learned to make spring scissors. Learning how to steel an edge like this opened the door to larger scissors for me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXKWhPkHNvE

 

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Those look great!  Well done.

30 minutes ago, Jeff Amundson said:

There's a discoloration of the etch on one blade that I don't understand.

Hard to tell, but it looks like that could be from either: (1) not having the steel completely clean from skin oils before etching, or (2) that could also be some decarb from your HT that didn't get ground out before etching.  That's something that took me a while to learn, to keep enough material to allow for grinding through the decarb.  Or you could use an anti-scaling agent before heat treating (I now use ATP-641 from Brownell's).

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Thanks, billyO. The first photo shows the blemish on the back of the blade. The last one shows it on the inside. The blemish appears to go through the blade. I used ATP-641 on all surfaces. I was etching and rust bluing at the same time, using rubber gloves etc., so I was attentive to cleanliness. 

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Those are lovely!  The discoloration looks to me to be an area that didn't get hardened.  1095 is good for that, consider it a bit of accidental hamon. ;)

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Really like these, nice work.  Let me get this clear though:  You do the complete grind, polish, etch, and sharpen before bending the "hoop" at the back of the scissors to finish the piece?  I assume you heat the back up with a torch to make that bend?

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1 hour ago, Alan Longmire said:

Those are lovely!  The discoloration looks to me to be an area that didn't get hardened.  1095 is good for that, consider it a bit of accidental hamon. ;)

Thanks Alan. I didn't want to be the one to use the h-word.:)

 

11 minutes ago, Dan Hertzson said:

 I assume you heat the back up with a torch to make that bend?

Thanks, Dan. No, the bend is done cold. The area of the bend is not hardened. I did all the rough grinding before heat treat. I pre-bent it to about 90 degrees for heat treat. That way I can quench both blades at the same time when I pull it out of the oven. I finish grinding the blades in that configuration, sharpen, then finish the bending. The video link I provided shows the bending really well at about 3:00. I aim for a thickness of about .040" to achieve the right springiness. It has to be that same thickness for more than 1" to work right. It's a tricky grind to keep it that thin and even from side to side. I can thin it out more after its bent to adjust the spring. 

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I keep coming back to these....I know a few fly fishers who would enjoy these on their fly-tying bench....

 

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5 hours ago, billyO said:

I know a few fly fishers who would enjoy these on their fly-tying bench....

 

The first few spring scissors I made went to fly tiers. Easy to pick up and put down. You don't have to wear them. 

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Don't do much tying these days, but there was a time that would've been the star of my tying station for sure.....

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Super neat! I also concur with the theory on the auto hamon...Clint

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