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Anybody worked with mizzou before?

I'm looking to redo the lining in my forge, and will be going over the 2" of wool.

 

Do I need to focus on a form and cast it, or can I spread it over the wool after buttering, like the hellcote I originally used?

 

I dont have any newer pics of its current configuration- but my forge has since been halved vertically to drop internal area, and down to one blown burner. I have also cut a pass-thru hole in the back wall for longer pieces and more venting.

 

I'm just looking to re-line with something a little more durable and flux resistant. 

 

Just have never used mizzou yet. I have htc100 for flame face lining as well to go over it.

 

Wondering if the castable properties of mizzou work for spreading? If not, ill go for a form and cast the inside... but thats gonna be some work!

 

 

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Edited by Welsh joel
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I don't know about Mizzou, but the current favorite castable is Kast-o-lite. It is just as hard and flux resistant, but also insulates a bit.  I think it can be troweled on.

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I know the two brands are the favorites in forges... but the shipping costs for kasto-lite that I could find in any quantity- were almost half, if not more than the cost of the refractory. :huh:

 

55lbs was a bit more than I was planning on needing.

 

Mizzou is 2/3 less cost.

 

Found a place that sold mizzou in 20lb quantity, at a lot less shipping cost... but, I'm beginning to realize why. My package arrived late, and damaged.

 

Got it yesterday, almost a week late. 

 

Well, fingers crossed- ill give it a try.

I'm planning on another forge build, smaller- just for blades. That will be a cast setup all the way.

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Next time you need forge supplies, check out www.hightemptools.com.  He sells kastolite and Satanite in 5 lbs increments.  Super easy to work with as well.

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Posted (edited)

He's one i looked at.

They have a flat rate at 20lbs too.. but shipping these days is pretty crazy. Lol.

 

 

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Edited by Welsh joel
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So the last forge I built I lined the bottom half with Mizzou and the top half with Kast-o-lite 30 mainly because I ran out of Mizzou. I didn't try to play it risky so I just spread it over the bottom half by hand waited a day to dry then flipped it over to repeat. I think with Mizzou if you try to go vertical with it you will need a form as it didn't seem to want to hold itself up. This is my one experience with it doing a fairly similar forge to your current one so that is my 2 cents.

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I actually had to go back and find my post on the last forge build I did to remember what I used.  Turns out I used mizzou.  Looks like I "poured" the floor and let it harden, and then I did the walls.  I do know that I did not use a form.

 

 

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Personally I have always had better luck with using forms with castable refractory.  Don't have to be too complicated.  I've used cardboard boxes lined with plastic bags, sonotube, sheet metal forms, foam insulation board, clay, and even vinyl sheet flooring.  You could trowel on a slightly drier than normal Mizzou mixture, but you will likely have to do it in sections (a base for the back, then two or three for the sides).  This may lead to separation inthe future unless you are careful with your installation. 

 

Wet Mizzou doesn't stick well to vertical or overhead surfaces.  In any case don't forget to "butter" the underlying insulation with a spray of water before placing the Mizzou to avoid having it dry out too rapidly on either troweling or casting.

 

Having used both I currently prefer Kastolite also for it's insulating value, but I don't know how long it will stand up to flux erosion.  Mizzou is pretty good, but a castable with 97% or better alumina content (like the old Greencast 97 is even better.

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Last welding forge and current small ribbon burner I used Satanite of walls and ceiling, Mizzou on the floor as it resists flux. I did several coats on both rotating as I applied. Used a 60w incandescent bulb to dry overnight and was able to add more the next day. I coated all using ITC 100. These 2 materials are easier for me to apply, I simply couldn’t get KoL or Plistex to spread and hold like mortar but that’s just me. They are also less costly. I bought from High Temp Tools in Alabama.

Gary LT

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I have a forge that I covered the ceramic matting with Mizzou and it works fine.  I just buttered it on.

 

Doug

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5 hours ago, Doug Lester said:

I have a forge that I covered the ceramic matting with Mizzou and it works fine.  I just buttered it on.

 

Doug

Awesome, what i was hoping to hear before I dug in on an experiment.

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