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Any more info appreciated


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So I am going to inherit this anvil. Lots work to restore.. Did a little research on it.. Illinois iron and bolt company. Does anyone have any more information  on this?  

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No additional info... 

But my opinion- its pretty rough. There's some usable face area... but inherited, as in family piece?

 

Is there much family history to it? As in- this was my great grandads, passed on... Etc.

 

Or did dad or brother buy it at a garage sale type thing?

 

That would drive my ideas on even touching it.

"Proper" restoration work, proper as in the right way restoration work is expensive, and alot of work.

 

If it was my great grandaddy's and I got it...I'd keep it just like it is.

Edited by Welsh joel
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I believe that is a Vulcan, or maybe an Arm and Hammer.  The round cartouche between the feet should tell you.

 

I know that you probably want to make it like new, but I would not do very much to it.  The top face is not too bad, really.  The tip of the horn is gone, and the top plate is broken, but for most knife forging, the horn is not that important.  The top plate of these anvils is pretty thin, if you try to resurface it, you run the risk of grinding right through it and then you've got a chunk of wrought iron in the shape of an anvil.

There is still a lot of work left for this little guy to do.  Rather than spend any time or money on this, use it as is for a year.  If it really won't do what you want, start saving up for one that will.  There is a ton of history here and changing it won't make a better tool out of it, but it will destroy the history.

 

Just my .02

 

Geoff

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Yep, it's a Vulcan.  They are generally okay, but not repairable.  This is because they have a cast iron body that was cast onto the steel face in the mold, with the steel face already at welding heat.  Any attempt to electric weld on it will crack the cast iron or make the steel face pop off.

 

As Geoff said, it still has a lot of life left in it!  Clean it up with a flap wheel on an angle grinder and use it.  I've seen much worse edges on Vulcans, that one isn't bad.  It's just kind of small.  30 lbs when new, by the 3 on the front foot.  Don't use a sledge hammer on it and it'll be okay.

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Thanks everyone.  I appreciate your insights 

 This was my step dad. father. So some sentimental attachment. If you think it's good for making knives, I might consider and get it.  Based on the comments and type of anvil how much would you take off with a flap wheel?

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Take only what you can get by to take off the surface rust.  Going after the dings and divots will take you through the top plate like Geoff and Alan said.

 

Doug

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The top plate is only 1/4" or less thick, and the part that is hardened is maybe 1/16" thick.  So yes, rust removal only. It doesn't have a lot of monetary value (for an anvil), but what there is is in the face. Anvils don't need to be flat and shiny.

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