Jump to content

Forge glove reinforcement


Recommended Posts

My cotton glove always tears up at thumb and index finger.

Now the new pack I bought is even thinner fabric than the last...

Any nifty ideas to reinforce the fabric?

(Other than sewing on leather something quicker maybe?)

IMG_20210425_204422.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't buy cotton gloves.  The only time to wear gloves when forging is while welding or working with a large bar under a power hammer.  At any other time they cause carpal tunnel syndrome and tennis elbow.

 

That said, when I do have to wear gloves, I use these: https://www.amazon.com/Tillman-Large-Deerskin-Unlined-Premium/dp/B002D8Y8E6/ref=pd_lpo_469_t_2/135-4027940-4541910?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B002D8Y8E6&pd_rd_r=513d557a-3a37-4c04-aac8-9c78a72c23cf&pd_rd_w=GmmcY&pd_rd_wg=xK3AT&pf_rd_p=337be819-13af-4fb9-8b3e-a5291c097ebb&pf_rd_r=2SDD4FQA1E6S20NFABHP&psc=1&refRID=2SDD4FQA1E6S20NFABHP

 

They are very thin split deerskin, buttery soft, and have more grip and scale resistance than cotton. They're also sewn with kevlar thread.  The long cuffs keep scale and flux out, and they're loose enough to literally throw off of your hand if you do get something hot in there. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

loose enough to literally throw off of your hand if you do get something hot in there

Learned that one the hard way... Also learned to use an apron... after I caught my hoodie on fire from an angle grinder...

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't tend to use gloves if I can help it, but I know a Local smith and welder who has to wear gloves due to a skin condition.

He wears very thin cotton gloves and thin deer-hide leather gloves over those.  While slightly cumbersome he said he's gotten used to it.  not sure if that really answers the question, but at least its an option if you absolutely need gloves.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I only use a leather welders glove on my non-dominant had to protect my tong hand from the heat of the forge.  A glove on your hammer hand will make the hammer harder to control.  The reason I use a welders glove instead of a leather work glove is that welders gloves are quicker to get off if they overheat.

 

Doug

Link to post
Share on other sites

dont worry guys, im not that green anymore

I spoke of "glove" singular, I do not wear a glove on my hammer hand

and when im doing forge welding/splattery stuff, I often brush the forge area and pillow(japanese style sitting/kneeling) and the collar of the glove with water, that way whatever tries to get in there, immediately gets doused.

tho mostly had stuff find its way into my hammer hand if it did splatter upwards to the hands...

 

I tried welders type leather gloves but those were, stiff and bulky which didn't feel good when operating the tongs.

cotton has worked flawlessly for me, with exception to durability...

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you don't want to go the leather route which in my opinion is safer vs fabrics then you'll want to look for gloves made of a stronger fabric. Cotton is not prized for its strength and resiliency usually its more used for comfort. If you want to go through less gloves try using linen or wool as they tend to be stronger than cotton and common enough to be about the same price. The thickness of the gloves and the threadcount will have an effect on durability so thicker is better until it gets in the way of feel and control.

 

Unfortunately as others have pointed out there is a reason fabric gloves are not that common a glove material for industrial work and that's a sacrifice of choice you will have to make. You can increase glove durability by using a stronger fabric and thicker material but that will only go so far. So if it still seems like you are burning through them I agree with Mr. Longmire Tillman are so far proved to be very dextrous but still give the protection and durability of leather for a good price.

Link to post
Share on other sites

gloves are what they are, I wear leather work gloves and gardening gloves, they are all consumable, i tried all cotton and thick cotton gloves like i saw people wearing in japan. and have settles with thinner leather or goat skin gloves. you get the feel and they last OK, but they are really a consumable.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just as a second thought, you could try some Kevlar gloves.  They should give you more wear resistance and more of a feel for your tongs.  They will still be a consumable item as Owen pointed out.

 

Doug

Link to post
Share on other sites

Y'all might think this is silly, but these are really not bad for hot work when you need 'em:

 

 

glove.jpg

They too are consumable after they get loaded with dirt and grease, but they are nice to have around if you need a good grip on something hot.

 

I used mine up, but wouldn't mind having another one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wear a welders glove on the left, mostly when I'm working on damascus billets, and a lighter leather work glove on the right.  My welding forge heats the handles up pretty badly.  I use the left hand to shield my right when reaching for the handles, the end of the handle is generally cool enough that the light glove is enough.  The welders gloves are sloppy enough for a quick dismount if needed.  My vertical forge does not heat the handles so badly, for the most part I can work bare handed or with just a left.

I had to get new gloves just this week, my right glove burned out and split from the outside of the forefinger to the end of the thumb, pretty much right where I need the protection.  The left glove looked like a crab, it had gotten so hot over time that the fingers were permanently crooked, and then the forefinger crumbled away and the liner caught fire.

 

Mostly I have trouble finding gloves that I can cram my hands into, even the XL work gloves are too small, I end up having to split the side seam to get into them.

 

Geoff

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...