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I've been wanting to make a WI Tsuba and thought I would share my experience.   I started with a 14mm x 44mm rod.  Etched it has some great texture 

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Second attempt I used a steel ring to hold pressure on the exterior edge and gentle hammer blows.   After forging out to 4mm x 72mm, I removed  the ring and created a raised edge and peened finish with light hammer work. 

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Cool!  It's really tough to forge wrought iron against the grain like that and not blow it apart.  Pretty much has to be at welding heat and fluxed the whole time.

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What kind of wrought iron is it?  19th/early 20th century iron or modern bloomery iron?  I hear that some of the first kind can be nasty to work with, but modern bloomers find that good soft iron is hard to make.

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Really nice, I really like the texture of gnarly wrought iron.

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Thanks everyone for the positive mojo!  From what I've been told, the WI was a 20' long tension rod used to support a wooden floor truss.  I forgot to mention that I was using a stainless steel hose clamp to hold tension on the edge while forging to 2".   Then I used a 2" steel ring and kept the piece fluxed and at welding heat like Alan mentioned.  

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here's a wagon wheel wrought iron tsuba I have been adding copper sekigane like David J and others have shown before. Teeth are filed into the Tsuba notches to hold the annealed copper sekigane.  Hammer blows to forge fit the copper bits without any solder. 

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