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Mulkey inspired billet


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I may be in over my head, but I'm invested now.  I don't have the starting pics, but I began with a billet of 20 layers 1095/15n20, then a couple of fat slabs of 1084 around a 3-2-1-1-2-3 1095/15n20 core, and another 1095/15n20 stack, so about 60 layers.  Welded, crushed, stacked, crushed, turned, crushed, and stacked and brought down to 2x1x15 inches.  After cutting that into slabs, I realized that I did not have enough material, so I did the whole megillah again.

Then I cut a bunch of 1x2 slabs and nipped the corners off to get here.

layout 427.jpg 

 

There are actually 2 more pieces that make up a square end, and I'm going to build a "push" block for the tip that I will weld to the box.  Now I have to build a can to fit this and assemble the whole thing.  I believe that I will tack weld the pieces to hold them, and then grind most of the weld away.

Who was the idiot who thought this was a good idea?

I also have all of this stuff to make into a scrapmascus billet.

Scraps 427.jpg

 

It's a sickness I tell you.

 

Wish me luck

Geoff

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You've got this Geoff :)

 

One tip I got from Gary that I tried on my last complex tile weld was to superglue the tiles together before putting them in the can.  It worked quite well for keeping things aligned when I packed them into the can.  Then I packed any empty space with 1095 powder to keep things tight.

 

Good luck!

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I had the revelation about 1095 powder just this morning, so I'm going to do that.  I already had the superglue idea in mind, but thanks for reminding me.  A wee drop in the can to gain the gods favor and I think I'll be ready to go.

I haven't been so wound up about a project in a while.  I literally had nightmares about it last night.

 

Geoff

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Geoff,

 

I haven't spent much time here for a while and just saw this.  I hope you don't mind me jumping in here.

 

From what I see, you have nice tight joints with your pieces which is important.  If you custom make a canoe to fit then the pieces  can't move within the can and tack welding them won't be needed.

With the arrangement that you have I would recommend that your first welding blows should be light hand blows on the edges.  Once you are confident that all is welded then you can use heavier blows on the flat sides of the canoe.  

[One good tip is to use longer than normal soak time @ welding temp when welding a canoe.]

 

If you have any specific questions let me know.

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Gary, thank you for jumping in, I figured that I had annoyed you enough with questions.  I am going to build the canoe from scratch.  I was going to superglue the pieces today and get the canoe built.  I was also going to fill any spaces with 1095 powder, there will be a bit of grinding on the edges to remove it, but I think taking up any space will help me.

I was going back and forth on where to start the welding pass, so your advice is valuable there.  I'm using a press, but a light hand on the edge is how I will start.

I'm pretty deep into this project and I don't have a plan B, so I really want this to work.  Slow and steady on the prep, and then a deep breath and off we go.

 

Geoff

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Since you're going to glue the pieces, something that can make it easier is to glue them to some heavy paper.  This will hold them in place until you get them into the canoe  and it burns off which will eliminate any oxygen inside the can as well.

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52 minutes ago, Gary Mulkey said:

Since you're going to glue the pieces, something that can make it easier is to glue them to some heavy paper.  This will hold them in place until you get them into the canoe  and it burns off which will eliminate any oxygen inside the can as well.

That is priceless info right there.

 

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Posted (edited)
My big canoe weld did not take in the middle, so in that sense it is a failure.  In another sense, I have 2 nice billets to make into things, and I learned stuff.
 
Geoff
 
canoefail.jpg
Edited by Geoff Keyes
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So I have to make some decisions. 

 

I can throw myself on the floor and kick my feet.  I've done that, so I need to move forward.

 

I can just take my lumps and just make things out of these pieces, there is a ton of material there.  BTW, what appears to be a crack in the bottom billet is not, I was able to grind right through it.
 

I could try refit the two pieces, weld them around then try to forge weld them, kind of like a Ferry flip.

I'm thinking that even if a reweld works it will look strange.

Any thoughts?



 

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I've not had much success with rewelding.  Were it me, I would use the larger piece for a blade and the smaller one for fittings.

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Posted (edited)

Sometime you need to reverse engineer things and design the knife around the steel.

 

[I would guess that the bad weld resulted from too short of a soak time.]

Edited by Gary Mulkey
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