Jump to content

Things to start forging


Recommended Posts

Hello guys, I'll start to build a small forge setup as a second craftwork, 'cause I'm in woodworking, but I want to make my own tools like chisels and planes and for blacksmithing as well, like tongues and hammers, but nothing too big and serious. The biggest thing I wonder to make is a axe with like 10 cm long blade for cutting branches. The hardest thing is forge welding.

 

The forge is not a big problem, I've tested some things and I can make a functional charcoal powered one for me. The anvil, in other hand, may be a little of a problem I don't know all the points that I need to consider, but thinking on use a 12mm thick x 100mm width leaf spring with a hole and stick it on a wooden block. 

 

My question is: for making such tools, hammers, tongues, punchs, I need a bigger setup or something that big will do the job? If the answer is no, how much further I need to take it to get some decent results, maybe in a long time, but not as long to make me feel mentally tired.

 

Thank's for the replies!

Link to post
Share on other sites

First of all, the word is tongs, your spell checker may have misfired.

Second, there is a lot of info here about shop built anvils.  A piece of leaf spring won't do the job very well.

Third, you don't need to do a wrapped and welded eye for an axe (unless you want to)  You could start with a small sledge or ball pien hammer and forge a nice little axe out of that.  You won't need to weld a bit into it since most tools like that are hardenable steel (1050 or 4140, often).

If by charcoal you mean real, made from wood, lump charcoal, that works pretty well, though you will burn through it quickly.  The pressed stuff meant for cooking burgers is not worth the trouble.

 

Welcome to the madness

 

Geoff

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Geoff Keyes said:

First of all, the word is tongs, your spell checker may have misfired.

Second, there is a lot of info here about shop built anvils.  A piece of leaf spring won't do the job very well.

Third, you don't need to do a wrapped and welded eye for an axe (unless you want to)  You could start with a small sledge or ball pien hammer and forge a nice little axe out of that.  You won't need to weld a bit into it since most tools like that are hardenable steel (1050 or 4140, often).

If by charcoal you mean real, made from wood, lump charcoal, that works pretty well, though you will burn through it quickly.  The pressed stuff meant for cooking burgers is not worth the trouble.

 

Welcome to the madness

 

Geoff

Sorry for the mistake :(

 

The forge welding is a skill that I want to learn, but first, to make an axe or a hammer I need to be able to punch out the eye and making a hole on a thick piece of steel isn't easy, I guess. So here is my question: How hard I need to work and how much serious I need to take on blacksmithing to get these results? Could I get it with a simple anvil and simple tools? 

 

Where I live the charcoal is pretty accessible and is made out of real wood :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

Simple tools, and the ability to use them, are all you really need.  That, and a decent amount of dedication to learning the craft.  From a bladesmithing standpoint, all the information you need is available here somewhere.  You just have to look around and do the reading.  A lot of it is useful for general blacksmithing as well, but thats definitely not the focus of this site.  A fairly accurate saying is that any blacksmith can be a bladesmith, but not any bladesmith can be a blacksmith. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Wayne Coe said:

Check out the Build a Gas Forge and the Ribbon Burner attachments on the Forge Supplies page at

www.WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com.

Let me know if I can help you.

About $100.00 plus the hose, regulator and burner using a 20# Propane tank.

 

A charcoal forge is better for my conditions, but I appreciate the support! :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

For a charcoal forge you will need about 6" of fire under you're work and about 3" over it.  If you want to see a simple charcoal forge go to Path of Fire on You Tube and take a look at the charcoal forge the smith there built or you could look up the Tim Lively forge.  Both of them pretty basic.  If you want a hand cranked blower you can go to USA Knifemaker Supply.  They have a good quality one but it was listed at $165.00 when I last checked.  Option #2 is to rig a hair dryer.

 

Doug

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...