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Would practicing with wood help at all?


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Having a hell of a time getting in plunge lines and bevels to be even and not multifaceted. If steel and belts were free I’d use steel to practice i guess. I’m wondering if making wooden knives help with bevel grinding practice? 

Edited by Nicholai
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  • Nicholai changed the title to Would practicing with wood help at all?

What are you using for tools?  Practice is what helps.  If you practice on wood, you'll be good at doing it......in wood

 

This guy built a grinding jig with a angle grinder

 

Draw filing, or a mix of draw and cross filing works to even things out

 

This is a project that I was concerned about screwing up the bevels on.  I did the heavy grinding on the 2x72, but all of the refinement was done with files

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IMG_1953 (Medium).JPG

 

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It's not fast, but how much of a hurry are you in?  My first teacher always said, make 50 of something, throw the first 49 in the scrap pile.  How many have you made, so far?

 

Geoff

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This was my second one.. I’m in no hurry. Do you file with a jig?, or just freehand. I’ve got a 2x42 grinder and a 4x36 grinder. I do have a decent set of mechanics files. Maybe I’ll try files next time 

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I quite frequently do the same thing that Geoff did.  Getting it 90% of the way on the grinder, and then finalizing with files. I do this especially if I'm working on a dagger or a knife with grinds that fall short of the spine.  It gives you a lot more control over the final product.

When it comes to practicing the mechanics of grinding, using cheap belts and scrap steel is always an option.  You just have to be prepared to invest time into something that you know you're going to throw away 

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8 minutes ago, Alex Middleton said:

I quite frequently do the same thing that Geoff did.  Getting it 90% of the way on the grinder, and then finalizing with files. I do this especially if I'm working on a dagger or a knife with grinds that fall short of the spine.  It gives you a lot more control over the final product.

When it comes to practicing the mechanics of grinding, using cheap belts and scrap steel is always an option.  You just have to be prepared to invest time into something that you know you're going to throw away 

Yeah I’m digging the idea of cheap belts and scrap steel.. I’ve been using rr spikes to practice hammer work so far.. but I’m leaving some deep dents and i can never get the sides perfectly straight. I’ve been trying to use a jig but as Alan pointed out in a separate thread, the jig can compensate for the blade inconsistencies. So ya.. i think you’re spot kn and I’m going to freehand and file until i get used to it. That’s my fav part of the process so far anyway (grinding), it’s therapeutic. 

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I made about a dozen or so knife shaped objects from mild steel scraps before buying blade steel. Seemed to help, for me. I found I do best with a bevel jig, really helps keep things even. 

 

I just finished my 3rd knife, so take my advice for what it is. 

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Been looking all over for some tips lol.. for starters this is seeming to help, which i suppose is something that y’all don’t even consider a tip but it is helping. Color the blade faces and edge with a wide tipped sharpie and use a metal vernier caliper to scratch two lines along the edge (the thickness i want to end up with), and also scratch a line say 3/4 way up the blade face, to guide the bevel height. The last knife i tried,, i ground sooo much that there’s almost nothing left near the bottom (next to where your index finger would rest on the handle),, and there’s a huge unsightly divot in the edge ..pfft. 

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1 hour ago, Nicholai said:

something that y’all don’t even consider a tip but it is helping

Of course that's a tip, and a good one.  It's something that most of us do all the time and it's probably second nature, which is why nobody mentioned this.  Sorry about that, but right on for figuring that out yourself

 

 

Edited by billyO
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21 hours ago, Matt M. said:

I made about a dozen or so knife shaped objects from mild steel scraps before buying blade steel. Seemed to help, for me. I found I do best with a bevel jig, really helps keep things even. 

 

I just finished my 3rd knife, so take my advice for what it is. 

Ya know.. I’m sure someone said this to me before but for some reason it just didn’t click. I can totally get tons on mild steel plates at my local store!.. it’ll cost about $2.50 per attempt. This is perfect!, I’m glad you mentioned it.. even though it should have been obvious but my head was too far down in the weeds to see anything. 

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1 hour ago, billyO said:

Of course that's a tip, and a good one.  It's something that most of us do all the time and it's probably second nature, which is why nobody mentioned this.  Sorry about that, but right on for figuring that out yourself

 

 

Yeah billy.. you said it better than i did. Second nature to you guys were the words i was going for! So second nature that i don’t even think about it lol. But yeah.. now that I’ve got my mild steel source worked out I’ll be grinding like hell this week lol. Hmm.. now is it worth it to get many cheaper belts or less more expensive ones like a ceramic. 

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8 hours ago, Nicholai said:

now is it worth it to get many cheaper belts or less more expensive ones like a ceramic

 

You're running a 2x48, right?  I wouldn't use ceramic belts unless you can use high spped and pressure. Otherwise they glaze and burn.

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Yeah I’ve got a 2x42 and a 4x36.. it’s what I’ve had for other things, mostly woodworking. I was thinking of using the 4x36 to flatten the faces since it’s easy to lay it flat. Might get too hot? 
 

the 2x42 i think runs at 4400fmp. I cut the top and back guards off to fit the ceramic belt. It worked but I’ve only used it once., so time will tell. 
 

 

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Save the 4x36 for wood, especially with the usual belt selection. You can get good belts from trugrit abrasives, but good files move metal faster than a 4x36.  Those also don't have sealed bearings, which means they don't last long around metal dust.

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Here's a link to a thread on another forum that really jump-started my journey into the knifemaking world with a lot of jigs and tricks explained

 

https://www.bladeforums.com/threads/wheelers-steel-stuck-in-the-metal-with-you.808140/

 

And that fact that posting links to other sites is OK proves to me that this is a great forum that values the sharing of knowledge over egos!

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