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Question about ASO’s


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I have two 2.5” thick 8”x11” plates. My thought was to weld these two pieces together to give me a 5” surface. 
 

is this ok to do? If so what process should i use to weld them, stick or tig?

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I wouldn't recommend it.  You will get a lot of vibration between the plates, even when using the 5" width.  I'd keep looking for a better option.  Wouldn't be the worst thing in the world either though.  

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55 minutes ago, Jerrod Miller said:

I wouldn't recommend it.  You will get a lot of vibration between the plates, even when using the 5" width.  I'd keep looking for a better option.  Wouldn't be the worst thing in the world either though.  

I’m still looking for things but I do have a thought. What if I welded those two plates together and then I put a 2 inch hard cap on it?I’m still looking for things but I do have a thought. What if I welded those two plates together and then I put a 2 inch hard cap on it?

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The solid chunk is the important part.  You said you were thinking of adding a 2" hard cap, which to me sounds like a 2" thick piece of hardened steel, which is nothing like hard facing.  

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2 hours ago, Jerrod Miller said:

The solid chunk is the important part.  You said you were thinking of adding a 2" hard cap, which to me sounds like a 2" thick piece of hardened steel, which is nothing like hard facing.  

That was what I meant putting a hard face on my using hardfacing mig wire or stick. 
Had a thought what if i ground the two large plates at an angle, enough to where i could physically join the entirety of the plates to one another through welding. It would then be a solid chunk. I dont have to pay for welding wire or rods. Then once it is a solid chunk put the face on with the appropriate wire or rod? 

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Try USA Knife Maker.  It has the Atlas knifemakers anvil in stock for $330 (don't confuse it with the Atlas knife makers anvil with a hot cutting tool which is out of stock).  It doesn't have a horn but it does have a hardy hole which will allow  you to use a bick tool (another name for a horn) plus other hardy tools.  It will end up costing you less than that do it yourself ASO and be a much better anvil to boot.

 

Doug

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20190615_163635.jpgWhat steel is it?

I welded the vertical sections of two fork truck forks together and it works really well. I use it more than my old London pattern.

Edited by Randy Griffin
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1 hour ago, Randy Griffin said:

20190615_163635.jpgWhat steel is it?

I welded the vertical sections of two fork truck forks together and it works really well. I use it more than my old London pattern.

I am not sure to be honest. The two plates come from part of a train coupler you do not see. On passenger train cars there are two pieces that are in line with the couple one is called a yoke the other is called a follower block. The coupler is attached to the yoke with a large round pin the yoke and follower both have these large plates along with a series of hard rubber backed and faced plates that are all stacked together and inserted into the yoke and follower. This setup allows cushioning for when the train takes off or brakes. 
 

i feel like they are harder than regular mild steel. They take alot of abuse. 

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When  I worked in a Railroad Blacksmith shop we made follower blocks from 1060 steel, I think this is an ARA spec. but not sure if  all follower blocks are made from the same stuff.

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They must be pretty tough to handle the abuse of coupling rail cars. Welded together they would make a fine anvil substitute. Or use a single one and only have 2 1/2" width. That's plenty wide enough.

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2 hours ago, Randy Griffin said:

That's plenty wide enough.

Indeed it is!

 

Go to this thread: 

Lots of good info there.  Your block would be great in the Paul Lundquist anvil-vise combo thingy towards the end.

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