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Are these of any quality rasps


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Can anyone tell me if these Bassoli 14" Black rasps are good quality steel or are they case hardened?? I talked with a guy who is a local farrier! This what he uses in his work. So I looked them up on the net and found them at centaur forge. Here is a link, but I can't find anything about the steel!!

 

https://www.centaurforge.com/Bassoli-14-Black-Rasp/productinfo/BLACK/ 

 

I know Heller rasps are supposed to be good as well. Anyone used any of these in knife or tomahawk making??

 

Anyone have a line on quality steel rasps?

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12 hours ago, C Craft said:

I talked with a guy who is a local farrier!

Have you asked him about what he does with his old rasps?  A farrier I know says he goes through 2-3 rasps a day, and I'm assuming he has the same attitude that many knifemakers have re: grinding belts, which is, "use 'em like they're free".   If so, there might be plenty of life left in his throw-aways.  Just yesterday I had to rasp off some rag from a chisel cut and grabbed the rasp I've had for smithing work for over 10 years and it worked just fine for my purposes, but probably not if time was money for me and there was a horse waiting on me.    

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Billy he says he has pile of them at his house. That is why I was  trying to find out if the steel is any good so I could make him an offer on them. I know nothing about the Bassoli brand. So many of this stuff, files and rasps have gone to crap! Nicholson used to be among the best, if not the best. However since they moved their plant to Mexico there aren't worth bringing home!! Like everything else case hardened a few strokes and their gone and the steel isn't any good for anything! head shake.gif

 

I was hopping someone knew something about the Bassoli brand! When I found them on the centaur forge I was hoping for good things!!

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I don't know beans about farrier's rasps, but all else failing you can ask him for a couple to try.  Heat treat them and see what happens.  Then make him an offer accordingly.

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Got it.  I guess because I just used my hot rasp for the first time in a few years, I wasn't thinking about turning them into other tools.

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1 hour ago, Gerald Boggs said:

Why not just do a spark test?

That can be thrown off a bit by case hardening.  

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I'd just try hardening and breaking the tang.  Those don't get case hardened, so if it does snap like glass after a quench, you're good. 

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Note also that just because they're good now doesn't mean the same brand will always be good steel.  But you knew that. <_< BTW the Hecho en Mexico Nicholsons are still 1095, they just weren't told how to properly heat treat them. Or how to index the cutting machines so the edge cuts line up with the face cuts, or how to index so that on a safe-edge file the face cut goes to the edge and doesn't stop a sixteenth away...

 

I have some old Bellota rasps that are probably W2, and some new Bellotas that seem case hardened.  Same thing happened with Sav-Edge.  If the farrier is gonna scrap 'em after every other horse, it doesn't make economic sense to use a better steel. The farriers pass the cost on to the horse owners, and everything related to horse ownership is far more expensive than it should be (Have you priced a box of shoe nails lately?  :ph34r:), so they don't really notice. 

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1 hour ago, Gerald Boggs said:

True, but how long before you grind past the case hardening?

Depends on the case hardening.  A case hardened surface also is a gradient of carbon content.  More at the very surface then tapers off until you reach the base metal composition.  

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Y'all got me to thinking now!  light bulb is lit.jpg I will have to get him to let me have one. Try to heat treat and then I will have an idea if they are worth messing with!!

4 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

Note also that just because they're good now doesn't mean the same brand will always be good steel.  But you knew that. <_< BTW the Hecho en Mexico Nicholsons are still 1095, they just weren't told how to properly heat treat them. Or how to index the cutting machines so the edge cuts line up with the face cuts, or how to index so that on a safe-edge file the face cut goes to the edge and doesn't stop a sixteenth away...

 

Hmmmmmmmmmmmm!

 

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recently made a knife from a mexico nicholson file that went dull fairly quick, i just now used it to cut at some forged/normalized 1075 with forge scale and it held its edge reasonably well. that is with an improper heat treatment as i dont have a temperature controlled oven, best i can do is heat to critical and quench in oil but as we know 1095 needs to be soaked at critical for some minutes to get the best effect. 

 

 

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21 hours ago, Jerrod Miller said:

Depends on the case hardening.  A case hardened surface also is a gradient of carbon content.  More at the very surface then tapers off until you reach the base metal composition.  

Now I think you're just messing with me.  It can't take more then a couple of seconds to grind down to base metal.

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1 hour ago, Gerald Boggs said:

Now I think you're just messing with me.  It can't take more then a couple of seconds to grind down to base metal.

It is just that it is a bit of a blurry line for when you get to the base metal.  Also gets complicated with a round wheel digging into a flat surface.  The deepest part will spark the base material, but the edge will still be sparking the surface.  

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