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You might want to check out Scholagladitoria on You Tube (Matt Easton).  He has an bit about a seax that was found in Sweden.  What  makes it special is that the handle is almost totally intact and nicely carved.  He also gives a link to the article about it, which I haven't gotten to yet.

 

Doug

Edited by Doug Lester
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Wow! Not what I expected to see at all. I find it fascinating to see something historic that contradicts the  modern interpretations. That is quite funky but also a treat to see something so well preserved. 

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Ha!  That makes me feel better about the Maldon Foes project Petr and I did way back when, before we knew what the handles should look like.  :D

 

12 hours ago, Bill F. said:

I wonder if it was chemically like bog oak and preserved it.

 

Same idea, anaerobic preservation, but in waterlogged clay rather than peat.  That's why it's not black, and also why the blade is still mostly there.

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If you saw that handle on todays reenactment stuff, it would get scorned. Its pretty carving, but not altogether what we thought for most part. I also have an impression from one of the 7. century seaxes with parts of handle preserved, that it had an ergonomic handle, quite like a modern machete.

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14 hours ago, Jaro Petrina said:

If you saw that handle on todays reenactment stuff, it would get scorned. Its pretty carving, but not altogether what we thought for most part. 

Well today it wouldn't be, as it's archeology based. But it also depends where you apply it. If you'd put this handle on a broad sax, or broken back style seax, then you'd rightfully be scorned for it :) 

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5 hours ago, Jeroen Zuiderwijk said:

Well today it wouldn't be, as it's archeology based. But it also depends where you apply it. If you'd put this handle on a broad sax, or broken back style seax, then you'd rightfully be scorned for it :) 

 It looks like it had some broken back  actually, altough the overall shape is corroded to tell exactly. 

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19 hours ago, Jaro Petrina said:

 It looks like it had some broken back  actually, altough the overall shape is corroded to tell exactly. 

Most certainly not. It's not even closely related to broken back style seaxes. It's more likely a Jorgensen's type 1 sax (narrow sax). 

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