Jump to content

Where to go with my W's pattern from here?


Recommended Posts

Hey, not sure where to go with my W's billet from here. I started this with only 13 layers. I doubled up on the 15n20 so it will be a brighter PWS. I did the tradition way for W's by forging out the billet, squaring it, then flattening out on the bias. I cut it into thirds, restacked, forge welded and drew that out. Right now it is at .480 thick 1.5 wide and I will have about 10" of useable steel. I cut off the end for a test etch and so far I really like the pattern. It may be tighter away from the end. Just not sure where to go from here. It is probably to thin to accordion cut, what about a ladder W, or I have heard of some people forging it square, cutting, and 4way. I am thinking the best bet is to maybe cut in half forge weld, leaving thicker and accordion cut. What is the thickness I need for accordion cut? Any suggestions would be great! Thanks

(Don't look at my messy work bench!)

 

20210914_201908.jpg

20210914_202038.jpg

Edited by Shane Atwood
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Shane Atwood changed the title to Where to go with my W's pattern from here?

Well, there are a great many options that you have.  Congrats on getting this far, but it might be a good time to hit the pause button and design/decide on your target pattern.  It is a real bummer when you are shooting from the hip at the forge, and realize that you've just forged something down too thin to create the pattern you want.  I've made that mistake quite a few times :(

 

Most of my W's end up as a mosaic, but accordion cuts yield similar results.  Mosaics are a little riskier, but the accordion cuts produce a lot of waste material.  (You can make some neat mosaics out of that waste material though)  Either way you'll want a bar that has a pretty squarish cross section.

 

I've seen some interesting things done with both ladder and twist patterns out of a W bar, but have never done that myself.

 

The interesting pattern is all in the "End Grain" of the bar, so you have to expose that somehow.  That pretty much requires some sort of manipulations that cuts deep into the bar to expose the pattern.

 

:Edit:

Oh, by the way, that is a total rookie level of mess on your workbench.  Once you have a dozen archeological layers, and store stuff by how long ago you used it to know how far down to dig, you can be properly embarrassed by your bench B)

Edited by Brian Dougherty
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

So you've got a 13 layer bar ~ 1/2 x 1 1/2 x 10....hmmm, let's see, WWBD...(what would billy do)

I'm not a huge fan of lower number layers, so take this with the grain of salt intended.  I'd probably cut that into 4 pieces, stack and re-weld and forge out into a bar about 3/4" thick, and then weld that to a bar of 1080 for the edge to mimic a san-mai pattern.  Here's a picture of a knife I did like that out of a scrap piece of crushed w's that was left over from doing an explosion pattern:

43.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Brian & Billy for your ideas! That's a cool looking knife Billy. I have thought of doing another billet of twist pattern and making a multi bar, but I don't know. I think at this point I will cut into 3rds, restack and weld. Then decide if I should do a mosaic, or accordion cut.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good looking W's. 

 

As Brian pointed out (and I'm sure you already know this) the end grain is the interesting bit, so the question is how will you get those W's on the surface of the blade and not just a tiny little mosaic at the end of the tang?

 

If you don't want to to the mosaic route, twisting is a good choice. Twist up two bars of this in opposite directions and use them as the center bars for a sword or dagger. It'll produce a nice explosion pattern like this (if you grind into it)

 

 

twist ws.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Dave Stephens said:

Good looking W's. 

 

As Brian pointed out (and I'm sure you already know this) the end grain is the interesting bit, so the question is how will you get those W's on the surface of the blade and not just a tiny little mosaic at the end of the tang?

 

If you don't want to to the mosaic route, twisting is a good choice. Twist up two bars of this in opposite directions and use them as the center bars for a sword or dagger. It'll produce a nice explosion pattern like this (if you grind into it)

 

 

 

 

Wow! That looks super cool! Will definitely have to give that a shot! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO, adding W's to almost any pattern 'turns it up a notch' so-to-speak.  Here's a blade I did that was a bit of extra from 1/4 of an explosion billet.  Basically it's a billet of crushed W's that I squared up on the diagonal and then forged the blade.  

20210621_110459a.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
On 9/15/2021 at 4:44 AM, Brian Dougherty said:

Mosaics are a little riskier, but the accordion cuts produce a lot of waste material. 

BTW- that material doesn't have to be wasted. You can put those cut offs back together and make another bar. Either by forge welding them directly back together, or in a can like I did here.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...