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How do you finish fullers?


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The piece I'm working on has a big fuller, really the first successful one I've ever done.

 

Is there a good way to finish them?  What kind of tools do people use?

 

I milled these, which left a swirled pattern.  I tried grinding with a stone on a dremel, but I'm still having to sand it out with a block and paper (80 grit to start, all of my 60 grit paper is too stiff to make good contact.

 

Any advice will help with the next one, but I can use the help.

 

G

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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Does anyone use lapping compounds?

 

g

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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Depending on the dia of the fuller of course but I ground an angle (and the teeth)  of the end of a round file and used it as a push scraper to get the majority of the milling marks off when I did them. It works a bit like the traditional scrapers but you have the milled fuller as a big starting point. You could always cut a few inches off the file  and weld  it to a bar to give leverage and direction to the push or turn it round and pull for more directable power.  Then the gritted papers and for my the 220 s where I start and go from there.

Edited by Garry Keown

Von Gruff

http://www.vongruffknives.com/

The ability to do comes with doing.

 

 

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Hello:

 

I forge them in and then do some clean up using a small drum sander 1/2" dia and sanding bands on my foredom flex shaft.. for smaller (narrower) ones I use files then papers around some round micarta to clean them out..

 

If I scrape them is the clean up is minimal if you are good at scraping..

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Depending on the diameter, you can usually just use the tip portion of a round or half round file.

Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

www.knifemaker.co.uk

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

Albert Einstein

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Check your contact wheels.  For a lot of mid-sized fullers I can get decent results working at various angles on a 2" or 4" wheel.  The widest one I've done was at a 45 degree angle on a six-inch wheel.  Final cleanup does involve a chunk of wood/hockey puck/etc. shaped to fit and sandpaper.

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I had considered a chunk of round file in a handle.  I have never had good results trying to grind them on a contact wheel free hand, and I don't have a jig that works.,  In this case I cut them with a 1/2" round nose mill bit.  That went pretty well, but then I had to sand the swirls out.  I used a chunk of hockey puck, ground to the profile and and sand paper.  I put a handle on the rubber and that let me use both hands to put pressure on the paper.

I'm going to try 80 grit lapping compound and a hard felt tip in my Foredom and see how that goes.

I was hoping there was something better than elbow grease, but at least now my elbows are really greasy.

 

Geoff

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"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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You can also make a profile wheel.  Hard wood, with the edge shaped to fit the fuller when held vertically. Split a belt to put it all on the grinder at low speed, and have at it.  Pad it with some masking tape.

 

I keep forgetting about this.

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When I'm doing small fullers, like 1/2 inch or so, I tend to take a piece of dowel around the same size diameter or slightly smaller, and cut a slot in it. Generally the dowel is say 3 inches and the slot goes about half of the length. You can then insert a long strip of sand paper and then wind it around the dowel, and use that to sand the marks away. the fuller here was ground to 120 on machine and then hand finished starting with 220 on the dowel, took no time! For smaller fullers this is a super easy and effective way to finish them.

 

 IMG_2222 copy.jpg

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