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Hello fellow makers ^_^

 

I recently got an interesting commission for a high end oyster knife. The customer allowed me go all in in terms of artistic design and budget. Thought adding a tentacles guard would be cool. I guess I'll need to make some punches for the tentacle suckers...

 

Tell me what you think! I know nothing about this tool so I sorta designed it based on the various shapes I've seen on Google :lol:

PXL_20211113_182639816.jpg

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4 minutes ago, Jaro Petrina said:

Why not go a step further and file the handle to resemble a clamshell?

It's funny cause I had thought of that as well. This would certainly increase the difficulty level. I will consider it as I proceed.

 

Thanks

I received some other feedback telling the blade was too wide. So I narrowed it down and it looks(and probably will function) better.

 

PXL_20211113_204314732.jpg

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On 11/13/2021 at 2:44 PM, Joël Mercier said:

This would certainly increase the difficulty level. I will consider it as I proceed.

I have complete faith in your ability to do this.

 

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10 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

Thanks, I guess. I'm gonna have to figure this out before I begin, cuz it's going to be an expensive piece of myrtle burl :blink:

In my Kitchen knife thread you told me "practice makes perfect" and that is as true here as it was there. I always do a practice piece before I set to the actual knife parts. It gets me back in the "groove" so to speak. On clamshell filework, I start with a triangle file to mark the lines and start the grooves. Then I can nestle a small round file in there and gradually open them up with larger rounds. Practice on pieces of scrap. 

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27 minutes ago, Jonathanbradshaw said:

I haven’t been sure where to begin. 

You tell me :lol:. I have no idea how this is going to end either. I'll complete the blade and see if the geometry makes sense. If not, I'll just design another one.

 

I'm going to put 5" radius hollow bevels and see if it works or not.

 

Edited by Joël Mercier
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I'm not an expert on these, but generally oyster knives aren't what I would call sharp.  They are more of a crow-bar than a knife.  It also helps to have a slight curve at the tip so that you can scrape up against the top shell as you sweep around the perimeter.

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12 minutes ago, Brian Dougherty said:

They are more of a crow-bar than a knife. 

 

This.  They are not hollow-ground, as that would tend to chip the shells.  They're often a fully convex grind with a blunt rounded point for the same reason.  They're not sharpened, as that would cut the meat.  And your hand, when you slip.

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Honestly, I believe this tool has been the one I've read the most contradictory information about, from both professionals and enthusiasts. 

 

Some like the flat screwdriver tip, some don't. Some like a bit of sharpness, some prefer blunt. I've also seen all types of geometry. 

 

My idea was to go for hollow grinds with a convex semi-sharp edge. Mostly because I wanted stiffness. Maybe I should go for a thinner blade with convex edges.....

 

My stock is 1/8" W2

 

PXL_20211116_012035570.jpg

Edited by Joël Mercier
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34 minutes ago, Joël Mercier said:

Honestly, I believe this tool has been the one I've read the most contradictory information about,

 

Well, if you want 10 different answers, ask 5 different experts :)

 

Truth be told, there are a lot of regional variations in the shells of oysters.  It's not surprising so many shucking approaches have developed.

 

Just make sure to include a gut hook in your oyster knife design :P

 

If you are not already aware of the Good Eats oyster episode, check out  season 8 episode 2.  (At least that's when it showed in the US)

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Have you used an oyster knife much? Best way to design one is experience. When oysters were cheap and still safe to eat we would sit around a fire and eat them by the sackfull drinking beer. Throw a few in the fire to pop open. That was some good eating. I prefer a semi sharp tip. Helps to get in some close spots to pop them open. Edges don't really need to be sharp. Just scrape the oyster from the shell. Semi sharp to dull also helps slow the blade when you shove it through your hand. The alcohol helps too. :lol:

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I have shuck a few but that was a loooong time ago. I love oysters but I always eat them at the restaurant, where they're already prepared...

 

So, basically "sharper" near the tip and full blunt everywhere else? 

Edited by Joël Mercier
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11 minutes ago, Joshua States said:

I have a really bizarre idea on how to figure out the geometry for this...........ask the client what he wants.

Sadly, I cannot. It's a retirement gift...

 

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