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Forge Weld Lines 5160


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I have a lot of 5160 ish type coil springs that are a little less than 3/4" round.  If I flatten them some and forge weld 2 or 3 on tope of each other, when I go to draw out a knife shape, does it matter where the forge weld lines are located?  Do they have to be on the spine?  Thanks!

Edited by DanielJones
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If your welds are strong, it shouldn't matter much. But a 3/4" round is plenty to forge a knife from so you don't need to stack them at all, unless you want to forge a large chopper or such. 

 

5160 is also tricky to forge weld to itself because of the chrome that quickly forms a thin layer of chromium oxyde that will prevent good welds. 

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11 hours ago, DanielJones said:

than 3/4" round.

That is about the same volume (a little more actually) as 3/8" x 1" , which just so happens to be my favorite flat bar size to forge from. When I am forging down big chunks of steel, I generally reduce them to 1" wide by 3/8" thick. I can get that to shape everything from a small skinner to a big Bowie. Hammer that round bar down to flat and spread it as you go. 

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Do some research on the process of fullering.

 

Done right, you could spread your rounds to twice their width.

 

Done wrong it will stay 3/4 wide and just get real long.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/19/2021 at 9:17 AM, DanielJones said:

I used my rounding hammer to get more of a spread

OK. Lesson #1 on hammer faces.

Imagine that your steel is actually a mud puddle and your hammer is an object you are going to drop in that puddle.

If you drop a round object, like a bowling ball (i.e. use a round hammer face) where does the mud move? It moves in a circle away from the impact.

If you drop a long rounded object, like a log (i.e. a cross peen or the corner of a square/flat hammer) where does the mud move?

It primarily moves away from the long sides of the log.

The type of hammer face and the angle of the strike is what controls where the steel moves.

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