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Confusion about quenching oils


Kerri Duncan
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So I am still a beginner after a few years thanks to just not being able to put the time "IN" I need/want to- I have the ability now to spend a bit more time and dedicate some financial resources to this.  Annnnnd- quenchants have me truly stumped!

 

I have a stash of 1075, 1080, 1084, 1095, O-1 and 52100 and 4140 bits I want to get through and I need to know is PARKS 50 too fast? or should I be leaning to "AAA" 

 

Confused and hoping for a bit of guidance- thanks!

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Parks 50 is too fast for 0-1.  It will work on the others, but you'll need to normalize the heck out of the 52100 and the 1084 to keep the grain tiny and the hardenability low.  It'll crack O-1, and 5160 is iffy.  Parks 50 was developed for the W series. 

 

On the other hand, AAA will work fine for all but the 1095, and it'll do that too if you heat it up to around 150 F.   AAA was developed specifically for O-1 and other medium- to high-alloy steels.

 

That said, it's the equivalent of Brownell's tough-quench, which is what Don Fogg used on all his knives. 

 

If you go with the P50, do it because you want to play with hamon.     

 

This is of course my opinion only.  B)  

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I have used Park 50 or the Texaco equivalent for O-1, 1095, W2, 5160, 1080/84, and basically anything else I needed to quench. Hancock used parks 50 for 52100 and anything else. The only time I had trouble with O-1 and Parks was when I had a blade with a hollow grind. Something about O-1 and that cross section didn't work well together. All that being said, you have a variety of steels and are new to the artform, so you have some time in front of you to experiment and decide which steels you are going to use in the long term.

 

Here's what I suggest, and there are two options.

1. Buy the AAA. It will work for everything you currently have except the 1095 and you can always go buy a jug of canola oil and use that, or do what Alan said.

2. Focus on smaller knives to start out and buy a gallon of each. A lot of knifemakers have both kinds in their shops and a 1-gallon paint can works just fine for blades up to 6 inches long. That way when you decide that you really like O1 and 1095.......

 

Welcome to the madness.

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5 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

If you go with the P50, do it because you want to play with hamon.     

 

This is of course my opinion only.  B)  

 

Thanks Alan! I will be playing with hamons... but I gotta walk before I run- so that will have to wait a bit.

 

 

2 hours ago, Joshua States said:

... only time I had trouble with O-1 and Parks was when I had a blade with a hollow grind. Something about O-1 and that cross section didn't work well together. All that being said, you have a variety of steels and are new to the artform, so you have some time in front of you to experiment and decide which steels you are going to use in the long term.

 

Here's what I suggest, and there are two options.

1. Buy the AAA. It will work for everything you currently have except the 1095 and you can always go buy a jug of canola oil and use that, or do what Alan said.

2. Focus on smaller knives to start out and buy a gallon of each. A lot of knifemakers have both kinds in their shops and a 1-gallon paint can works just fine for blades up to 6 inches long. That way when you decide that you really like O1 and 1095.......

 

Welcome to the madness.

 

Thanks Joshua- I have been dickering about here and in a few other forums for a looong time unfortunately- too long. I keep hoarding drops and scraps from machine shops of known steels so I can dial in a process and figure it out... thus the motley variety of my stash- I even have 2 plates of ATS-34 hiding about (from a going out of business machine shop- yes I am aware I need foil and a HT oven for that- just couldnt pass it up for the price)...

 

Think I  am going to have a fun winter- AAA sounds like the bees knees for startup!

 

Thank you folks!

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