Jump to content

Recommended Posts

2 minutes ago, billyO said:

??:wacko:

It was one of the really failed attempts. I was hoping for something spectacularly destructive to happen, but all it did was slpit wood really well while looking really ugly.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 68
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

So I happened to pull out the design drawing and see how much of a curve the edge needed and I noticed that my latest sucess fell drasticly short of the required demensions... Yay for me, I made anoth

So my very first hatchet attempt got seriously reprofiled after I ground down to solid welds. It's pretty but not very correct. I'm not sure if its a mutant hybrid, or if there is a technical name for

Well we gave it a whirl. Not sure if it is salvagable. One side looks like it didn't weld all the way to the corners, the other side looks like it did. The bit was oversized all the way around and I d

Posted Images

Well, success isn't always pretty... :P   the fact that the delams didn't open up shows you got good welds in there.

 

Grader blade is usually T2 abrasion-resistant plate. Low carbon, high manganese. Tough stuff, and fine for axe bodies!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

and allow me to add, playing with unknown steels and getting them to weld (well, mostly;)) is a big win in my book..

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

So I happened to pull out the design drawing and see how much of a curve the edge needed and I noticed that my latest sucess fell drasticly short of the required demensions... Yay for me, I made another one! Outside of a rather forceful hammer blow on the edge that has to stay, it came out fairly well. It is etched and has a handle rough shaped. I do wish there was a little more damascus showing, but at this point that is something I can live with so long as I get this off my bench.

My next hair brained idea is to inlay some antler peices into the handle about half way up. 

20220110_115305.jpg

20220110_115400_HDR.jpg

20220110_115349_HDR.jpg

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm so glad that the forging and grinding are done. Now I'm just having fun. 

20220111_153619_HDR.jpg

20220111_153400.jpg

20220111_153354.jpg

20220111_153348.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

The important one is done and ready to go! The eye on this one is by far the best out of the five that I made, which is maybe a little sad cause this one is still crooked. I have little doubt that it will preform very well, despite the imperfections.

Thank you to everyone who imparted their wisdom, and encouragement. I greatly appreciate your help and patience.

20220115_123410.jpg

20220115_123450.jpg

20220115_123458.jpg

20220115_123522.jpg

20220115_123547.jpg

20220115_123609.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the inlay in the handle?  Whatever it is it looks neat. 

 

Yes I see what you mean by blade not being straight.  Just call it a right handed hewing ax and say that's how  you designed it.:D

 

Doug

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Doug Lester said:

What is the inlay in the handle?

Elk antler.

I got a little heavy handed when I closed the edge, and you can still see the wayward hammer blow on the right side of the bottom of the eye. It is on the very edge, so while it looks like the sides are super uneven, they are really only slightly uneven. If I had been thinking when it happened I would have put a matching one on the other side and then a few more down the blade and called it decorative hammer work.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Now you are thinking. I used to work in the music business, both as a musician and a techie. The best soloists in the Biz used say this about mistakes or bad notes.

" If you play a bad note in a solo, play it again. People will think you meant to do it."

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

So my very first hatchet attempt got seriously reprofiled after I ground down to solid welds. It's pretty but not very correct. I'm not sure if its a mutant hybrid, or if there is a technical name for something that looks like a tomahawk and has a hatchet style poll. I used red oak for the handle and used Don Abbott's iron acetate recipe to dye the stripe.

The damascus turned out way cool on this one. I was thinking about keeping it, but I put a picture on my facebook page and have a couple people who want to buy it. I have a hard time selling rejects though, so it will probably end up as a gift somewhere down the road.

20220115_152638.jpg

20220115_152658.jpg

20220115_152725.jpg

20220115_152740.jpg

20220115_152805.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

You have a FB page? I thought FB was for old people.......:P

I like that one.  It has that look about it that says "frontier life" where everything had multiple uses and was sort of hybrid in form.

 

28 minutes ago, Faye said:

I have a hard time selling rejects though,

Get over that. If someone wants it, sell it to them, as long as you feel confident that the HT is good, and it will perform as intended. Offer a return period and call it good. Don't think of it as a reject. Think of it as an experimental axe, which is exactly what it is. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Faye said:

I have a hard time selling rejects though

 

22 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Get over that. If someone wants it, sell it to them, as long as you feel confident that the HT is good, and it will perform as intended. Offer a return period and call it good. Don't think of it as a reject. Think of it as an experimental axe, which is exactly what it is. 

This.

Any time I have a "cosmetically flawed" piece, I let the buyer know and sell at a slight discount. At least enough to make back all (including machine wear) material costs and a little for time. Helps keep the hobby going (which makes me happy) and empties out the growing pile in the closet (which keeps the wife happy ;)).

 

BTW, both those axes look nice.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Doug Lester said:

Joshua, be careful what you say about old people.  One of these days you just might get to be one.:P

 

Doug

I'm there already......

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/17/2022 at 4:56 AM, Faye said:

if there is a technical name for something that looks like a tomahawk and has a hatchet style poll.

 

There is,it's called a Biscayne pattern.

One of world's oldest metallurgical centers,the Bay of Biscay,was the origin of those cheap "trade axes" originally imported into the New World,to eventually become what is known as a "tomahawk".

Those were light,poll-less axes of different sizes and weight,heavier ones used for felling and other forestry chores(many older felling axes used on hardwood had a narrow bit,to concentrate force of impact).The smaller ones were used in orchard and vineyard work.

Traditionally and to this day most of these tools had a compression-fit handle,the system of hafting,another characteristic that contributed to the later concept of "tomahawk".

 

Not surprisingly the pattern was(and is) more common in Central and South America,those places originally colonized by the countries sharing the Bay of Biscay coastline.

Here's a typical example of a Swedish product forged for that market: 

 

Hults-Bruk Catalogue 1930_0022.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Great job on All of these,Faye,good for you for persevering,and working your way through the inevitable challenges.Right on.

 

All of the axes above would sooner qualify as "poll-less".

That extra mass at the poll is fairly difficult to come by in a folded-type of pre-form.

It Was done,but the starting stock would have to be 1" thick minimum,or even better.

Alternatively,that mass was added by welding on an extra piece,or in later years by slitting&drifting the eye.

 

It's a very odd idea to use an axe in butchering game in the field.

It ruins the meat,and deposits sharp bone shards throughout what will be food.

In subsequent butchering,in some cultures, an axe was used for making certain cuts like chops,and splitting soup bones for more effective cooking,but those were very specialized meat axes(very broad and thin of blade).

In the last couple-three decades there's a presence of a confusing term,"hunter's axe",that i think was popularised by some Swedish makers in an attempt to create more business among the outdoorsy and so on.

Those are meant for hunting camp chores,not for the parting out of a game animal.(Some have a rounded and polished poll,for ostensibly "beating the hide off",another made-up concept).

 

Also,axes were at times driven with another tool but Very rarely,and then only with a wooden mallet. It stands to reason-a kind of poll that is suited for striking is Really different.

An example of that are the top tools used in forging:The poll is very long(for anything used metal-on-metal Will mushroom and needs to be dressed periodically),but also the sides of the eye are Way thicker to transmit energy in such use.

Indeed the eye shape itself is different,smaller,and a short oval close to round.Many of these were also not wedged,as the wedge works poorly with being beat on.

 

There` was a pattern on the West Coast called Rafting,axes with extra-heavy poll that had a hardened face(moderately thin,to prevent fracture,like anvil facing).

These were used to drive the eye-spikes to attach the chains that held the log rafts together.

Those spikes were very soft,to prevent damage to axes,but still those axes suffered damage to the face eventually,having to be dressed et c.

 

Just some very general info here,obviously we all choose to design,and use,the tools any which way We desire to!:)   

 

 

 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/17/2022 at 7:28 AM, Joshua States said:

You have a FB page? I thought FB was for old people

It's a product of being a homeschooler who lives surrounded by much older people.

I hadn't thought of offering a return period. I'll keep that in mind for sure.

17 hours ago, jake pogrebinsky said:

It's a very odd idea to use an axe in butchering game in the field.

I agree. When the gentleman told me what he wanted the hatchet for I scratched my head for a while. I had never heard of anyone using a hatchet to process game. He said he uses it only to quarter elk, I do not hunt or butcher animals though, so I didn't question it to much.

Thankfully he is a local guy and I've know him a long time, so if the wedged handle totally fails when he beats the snot out of it, he can bring it back for a different handle.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...