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Case hardened 1060


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It just occurred to me:  It's not hard-chromed, is it?  Just plain case hardened?  Because chromed is not something you want to forge.  As long as it's just carburized, that'll diffuse into the rest of the steel during forging.  

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One inch diameter rebar rod wasn't much fun by hand.  I can't imagine a two inch diameter rod of anything with just a hammer and anvil.

 

Doug

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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I'm just going to throw out there that it appears that the case hardening of the 1060 shafts from McMaster-Carr are not further carburized, merely induction (probably) heated to a shallow depth prior to quenching (probably integral spray quench as the bar passes through an induction coil).  So the chemistry is likely to be 1060 throughout the entirety of the bar.  

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44 minutes ago, Jerrod Miller said:

I'm just going to throw out there that it appears that the case hardening of the 1060 shafts from McMaster-Carr are not further carburized, merely induction (probably) heated to a shallow depth prior to quenching (probably integral spray quench as the bar passes through an induction coil).  So the chemistry is likely to be 1060 throughout the entirety of the bar.  

Thanks Jerrod.

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3 hours ago, Gerald Boggs said:

Press will work.  I asked, as I once forged by hand a hot cut out of 2" 4140.  Never again :-)

I had a 1.25 in. 1045 bar and made my first axe drift out of it with a hammer and anvil. Bought the press because of it. 

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