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What is it


Randy Griffin

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It’s going on 2 years now and I still can’t do much in my shop so I’m still watching videos. By God there ain’t a YouTube video out there about blacksmithing and knife making that I ain’t seen. I ran out of new stuff so I been watching fish cleaning lately. Lots of different styles of knives used on fish. I’m partial to the Japanese knives, especially the single bevel ones. I see this one a lot, especially on big tuna and billfish. I been trying to find a name for it with little luck. I see it called master Kuo, tuna knife, fish chopping knife, larding knife, ext. I can see a lot of uses for this butchering large animals as well as fish. Does anyone know what this style is called? Looks fairly easy to make.

B38EC517-A8E9-4DC8-A7C7-55AD8273BEDA.jpeg

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Just my gut reaction, but very difficult to comprehend how something like that could be useful, now I need to go look for those videos and see for myself.

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I did a quick google search and only have Taiwan Tuna Knife to add to your list of names. One Amazon listing also included “Maguro” and “Magurokiri” but if you search those, you get a long bladed knife that looks nothing like these. Could be an authentic style of knife, or just marketing hype.

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20 hours ago, Christopher Price said:

I made a Japanese "Deba" knife similar to a couple of those.

I'm sure there was a recent thread about those, and if you google "deba knife" you get images similar to the "normal" knife bottom middle

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/29/2022 at 11:16 PM, Gerhard Gerber said:

Just my gut reaction, but very difficult to comprehend how something like that could be useful

 

Gerhard,for cultures that use a lot of flesh in their diet,(fish in particular),it's important for the cut through the meat to be Continuous,a single-cut,with no back-and-forthing or jaggedness. As any irregularity may end up harboring a harmful bacteria,especially for dried or otherwise preserved product.

 

The semi-circular blade serves that purpose quite well. An ulu-like radial action simply stays in it's track easily. Today's mechanized slicer for cold-cuts and cheese functions on the same principle.

(so does a radially-ground chisel in ironwork,or that same shape in leather-cutting tools).

 

Tuna being a very large east,and it's meat being very expensive,it's a small wonder this shape is particularly associated with butchering it.

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God is in his heaven,and Czar is far away...

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10 hours ago, jake pogrebinsky said:

 

Gerhard,for cultures that use a lot of flesh in their diet,(fish in particular),it's important for the cut through the meat to be Continuous,a single-cut,with no back-and-forthing or jaggedness. As any irregularity may end up harboring a harmful bacteria,especially for dried or otherwise preserved product.

 

The semi-circular blade serves that purpose quite well. An ulu-like radial action simply stays in it's track easily. Today's mechanized slicer for cold-cuts and cheese functions on the same principle.

(so does a radially-ground chisel in ironwork,or that same shape in leather-cutting tools).

 

Tuna being a very large east,and it's meat being very expensive,it's a small wonder this shape is particularly associated with butchering it.

Live and learn, thanks Jake!

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