Jump to content

Question about welding high carbon to wrought iron


Brian Dougherty

Recommended Posts

So I have some 3/4" square wrought iron I purchase with the intent of welding on a steel edge to make a wood chisel.  I'm thinking it would be better to get the 3/4" worked down closer to the final dimensions before welding on the steel, but I thought I would ask.  I'm wanting to make a 1" wide chisel so there needs to be a fair bit of reduction in thickness but not much increase in width.

 

I'm thinking I should take the wrought down to about 1/4" thick and then weld on my steel which is about 0.080" thick.  Then forge out from there.

 

This is my first go at anything with wrought, and all I know is that I need to keep it very hot :)

 

 

Edited by Brian Dougherty

-Brian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've just made one wrought/HC billet so far. The HC was 26c3. All I can tell is the wrought will spread easier so you may end up needing to trim the edges. So forging your wrought near final thickness before welding is a good idea. 

Edited by Joël Mercier
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brian,

This is iron(old wagon wheel) with W2 steel….the W2 is .80 ball park….the wrought was forged close to final shape before welding …the W2 was left the flat ,not tapered.

the amount you can see the wrought has moved past the steel was from just the one welding heat and then one more heat to adjust it to shape….the sides have had the over lap ground off already

AF1978AB-4228-46A8-8432-0ECCB6CF0228.jpeg

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We'll, it seems to have stuck.  I knew the lateral line that transitions from wrought to 1075 wasn't going to weld this way, and sure enoughr there is a seam there.  Do people normally scarf that transition?

 

 

PXL_20220604_181111464.jpg

-Brian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What Gerald said.  In extreme instances, the steel can cut the wrought.  Like I said, at welding heat the wrought squishes like clay, the steel doesn't move at all in comparison.  

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going to call this a win.  I learned quit a bit for next time :)

I did a quick dunk in some ferric.  Looks like the wrought is going to have some patterning to it.

 

 

 

PXL_20220605_203910380.jpg

PXL_20220605_203851398.jpg

PXL_20220605_204031692.jpg

  • Like 5

-Brian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice job Brian… looks good ….tapering the tool steel like Gerald And Alan mention is the correct way….the picture of my plane blade is a good example  of not using a taper and how it will cut the wrought like Alan said…. It’s why this blade was not finished…

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I realize I'm a bit late to this, but there are a few tricks that have helped me with this in the past. Scarfing has already been mentioned and is definitely important to getting a good weld. Another thing that helps a lot is to make the hard steel wider than the soft material and leave on overhang, maybe 3/32", around all of the edges or sticking proud of a chiseled cut for an axe, warikomi knife, etc. On something like a 12" yanagiba you can't really forge to final dimensions before welding, so something like this is necessary otherwise the wrought iron/mild steel will wrap all the way around the tip and you will lose an inch or more of your forging (ask me how I know...).

 

 I first saw this when watching a lot of videos of the forging of Japanese kitchen knives, especially of ni-mai construction, though I'm sure it shows up other places too. You can then either just let the wrought spread up to the edge of the high carbon steel and then keep the two in-plane or proactively bend the edge-steel slightly over, encapsulating the softer material. You can see the results of this in some chisels and plane blades. I tend to prefer the latter strategy because you are more certain of where the good steel is, and for a forging that gets drawn out to 3x it's original length after the weld it is all but impossible to get the tip to work otherwise.

 

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...