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I have a guy asking me to clean up a couple blades. Claims Don made them for him, but I don't see his mark anywhere. When I zoomed in, that gold dot just looks like a pin, not his Chrysanthemum. Are these really early examples?

 

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The Tidewater Forge

Christopher Price, Bladesmith

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They do look right, especially the dagger. Not convinced about the other one... Ask for better pics of the dot.

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Ok, I think they're legit.

Customer (Bill Ferris) says: "I’m not sure if just polishing would help, most likely refinishing. They don’t need sharpening."

 

So if I take this, it's fine stones/paper and a lot of caution. Wondering what to even think about charging for the effort.

 

 

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The Tidewater Forge

Christopher Price, Bladesmith

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My take is that much of the value is in the original finish state.  I have refused to touch blades of much less value and history for just that reason, anything I could do would take away from, not add to, the value.  What is the owners intention?  Is he trying to sell them, or does he just want them shiny?

 

The collector world runs both ways, and tastes change.  In the 70's and 80's collectors wanted re-finished furniture.  Then some collector began to think that old surfaces were better and the whole market swung around to that idea.  Today restorations are kept to a minimum and with an eye to being able to reverse them if desired.

 

Cars are the same way, for many years collectors wanted vintage cars in better than factory condition.  But of late, the idea is to preserve good examples in as found condition.  A Bugatti type 31 was found in a garage with original paint and interior and brought a record price in that condition.  Jay Leno has the last unrestored Duesenberg which he has decided to make running, but to leave the mark of the years.  He thinks it's the most valuable one in the collection.

I think (without being all slobbery fanboi about it) that these blades are in that category.  More info is needed.

Just my .02

 

Geoff

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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I'm with Geoff.  Absolutely do not touch the fittings or the wood. Any light rust on the blades, just oil.  Not knowing how Don did the final finish, anything done differently would ruin the value and feel.  Has the guy tried to get hold of Don himself?  Not that I know how to, just curious.

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