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I made this


Evan Louis

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So this is the second knife I’ve forged, it’i don’t have the handle on it yet, clearly. However, I’m not entirely sure what kind of knife this is. It’s not the one I set out to make but I still think it looks fine, even if the handle is oversized. So what kind of knife would this be classified as?

A4831E7E-05E7-4BE1-88F2-05FC7A252A58.jpeg

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Unsure how to answer- except for... practice! It doesn't matter what it is, you're making it.

 

Worry about a bowie knife- looking like a bowie knife 20 or 30 knives in, when you have alot more practice and skill under your belt.

 

I like the recurve of the handle compared to the blade. Can't wait to see it finished.

 

I like nice, finished masterpiece knives, yes.

 

But I love to see work from people who are just starting- even more. It's pretty cool to see progress.

 

Get it handled, finished.

Then think about what to do better, different from this last blade.

 

Most of all... keep going!

 

I haven't been in my forge in six months! Stupid life and responsibilities... :blink:

Edited by Welsh joel
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What Joel said.  That's a fine example of a new maker blade, or what happens when you let the steel say what it wants to do rather than bending it to your own will.  On a single-edged blade that will always get you that upswept tip and curved spine.  Keep it up!  And think about what you wanted it to look like.  Show us, and we can probably give you a few tips on how to get closer to that idea.  Like, to keep the blade straight, you can either pre-bend it in the opposite direction or just hammer it straight at the end of every heat. Use the peen to draw down the bevels to avoid lengthening the edge, stuff like that.  Most of this requires constant corrections with every heat, since once the edge is thin it doesn't compress well at all.  

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It's called a KSO. I don't mean that in a bad way. We all made these in the beginning, and we made plenty of them.

The upswept blade is reminiscent of some butcher knives I have seen. The way I avoid this is to start with thicker stock than I want to finish with. As the bevel is forged in, the length grows and the tip starts to rise. I then forge the spine toward the point, making the spine thinner and the blade longer. This pushes the point back down. I forge by switching from bevel to spine until I have the blade length and width I desire.

You could take that blob off the heel of the handle and grind a little more to develop a bird head there. This would push that pin hole more toward the center, reduce the handle length to a manageable size, and not risk having a large piece of handle without any mechanical connection.

 

2 Inkednew blade critique_LI.jpg

 

Honestly, I don't know why we all start with full-tang handles. The prevailing myth is that they are easier than partial tangs and they aren't.

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

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To make the adjustments after every heat or two like Alan said I have a wooden maul I made from a rough turned cylindrical turning blank that I got from a dealer on Ebay and glued a 1 1/2' wood dowl in one end of it.  A maul like that will mover the steel without really compressing it.  Some people call it a thwacker.  Sort of after the sound it makes when you hit the hot steel with it.  Very good for nudging the steel in the way that you want it to go.

 

Doug

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HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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Looks like the start of a good Elk skinning blade.   I live in Roosevelt Elk country and those big old bulls take a lot of skinning!  Don't make the handle too small, you need something to hang onto when peeling hide.

 

I would make a smaller caping knife to go with it.

 

Any elk Hunter would be proud to have the pair!

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Thanks guys. What’s a KSO knife?

 

John, I don’t forge barefoot, I took the picture a while after forging. I’m not that manly. I ended up shortening the handle a bit. 
Unfortunately I don’t have any horn or antler for the handle. Not even sure where to get some. I currently have purple heart scales for it. 
It’s made out of a leaf spring, so probably 5160?

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A KSO is a knife shaped object and I don't think yours qualifies.  I agree with John it looks like a trailing point skinner.  Antler you can get at places like Moscow Hide and Fur.  Antler and horn can also be had at most of your knife supply houses.  Just be warned, antler reeks when it's sanded.  The last time I worked with it it took3 days to get the smell out.  I'm fortunate that I live alone or the wife could have given me the devil.

 

Doug

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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Antler is like micarta:  Stinks and you do not dare breath the dust.

 

One of my grinders has a coolant system, it works great to kill the dust.  It is a portable unit that I can move from lathes to ginders.  An air mist that mixes with the coolant.

 

And the shop is 50 feet from the house,so no smells to upset the ladies.

 

I live in Elk Country so I have a collection of antler in the scrap boxes.

 

The fixed handle in the below photo is a good skinner.  I bought in in 1964 in Parry Sound, Ontario and gave it to my dad.  Parry sound is sort of the jumping off place for the great North Country.   This one has a thin blade and is nicely heat treated, holds a razor edge very well.  Made in Germany.  The shop was very interesting, it was an outfitter for folks entering the wilderness.   Lots of indigenous folks, the shopkeeper said this was one of their favorite blades for skinning large game.  Handle could use a bit of improvement.

 

The two big folders were my dad's, he liked this style as he did not use a belt knife in a scabbard.  I have had the trio since he passed in 1994.

 

 

 

 

 

Knives 004.jpg

 

 

Micarta handles

 

 

Knife Blanks 001.jpg

Knives 010.jpg

Edited by John Ricks
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It is a Haflinger, a very strong draft horse of somewhat smaller stature.  The daughter had two of them, they are broke for both a saddle horse and a pack horse.  Very strong animal.  

 

The Haflinger, also known as the Avelignese, is a breed of horse developed in Austria and northern Italy (namely Hafling in South Tyrol region) during the late 19th century.

 

They also have several mules, broke for both the saddle and the pack string.

 

 

 

 

 

 

44 packing out 3.jpg

 

 

 

 

1 first load out.jpg

Edited by John Ricks
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