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Misery Whip


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Maybe because I find the process of filing rewarding, I don't know any other reason why I decided to begin restoring an old two man saw that looked like it should be on a scrap pile. Anyhow the saw - has gone though the entire process.  I did not have one of the proper tools but made do with some home made ones that accomplished the multitude of tasks needed.

 

The saw cuts, surprisingly, but does not produce a shaving as it cuts. Makes more dust on the dry oak I'm testing it on. Anyone have any experience with these saws.  All the info I've found so far states that the raker tooth should shave wood out of the cut.  I'm wondering if I've got something wrong after following the actual guide for how to set up one of these for cutting dry timber. 

 

I restored two other saws that were not as bad as this one which cut like grizzly bears. 

 

 

Edited by Daniel W
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Kudos to you for restoring a piece on a nearly lost history. I cut the last one I had up and made knives out it! ashamed.jpg In my own defense, it is when the knife making kraze first hit me!

 

 

 

A two man saw doesn't really make shavings but, if it is not producing the cut you are expecting. It could be the dry wood! Or it could only be angle of tooth filing or, set of the tooth. I watched an ole timer actually set the teeth on a two man saw with a small hammer over the edge of an anvil. However I am going to bet it was not his first rodeo! I wish I had better advice! 

 

Edited by C Craft

C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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My father had a tool somewhere that belonged to my grandfather, like a set of pliers, and my father told me they used it to bend the saw teeth back out, alternating of course.

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4 hours ago, Gerhard Gerber said:

My father had a tool somewhere that belonged to my grandfather, like a set of pliers, and my father told me they used it to bend the saw teeth back out, alternating of course.

Back in the late '50s, I used to watch my grandfather sharpen hand saws. He used a saw set to set the teeth. This was after filing the teeth if I remember correctly. The last thing he did was to take a sewing needle, place it in the set of the teeth, tilt the saw, and watch the needle as it slid down the length of the saw. If it jumped out, he knew at least one tooth wasn't set correctly

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Setting the teeth needs the tip iof the tooth to be bent half a tooths width to the side that the point of the tooth is sharpened toward. There are tools for this and  promotes the kerf width to stop binding and eases the removal of the cut wood which should be more strip than dust for a porperly sharpened larger saw.

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Von Gruff

http://www.vongruffknives.com/

The ability to do comes with doing.

 

 

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16 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

I suspect it's the dry oak.  Try it on green pine and see what it does...

 

I suspect it is this - as I set this saw up, I set it with the intention of dried timber as a lot of the stuff I have to cut up on my property is this dead dried pin oak.  Due to the shape of the teeth on this one, it looked like it was better suited for hard wood. 

 

Of the other two saws I have, the giant bucking saw from my great grandfathers time, is more set up for soft wood. The one man with the second handle is also set up for hardwood - and that saw, is surprising. 

 

On 8/24/2022 at 8:43 AM, Ron Benson said:

Back in the late '50s, I used to watch my grandfather sharpen hand saws. He used a saw set to set the teeth. This was after filing the teeth if I remember correctly. The last thing he did was to take a sewing needle, place it in the set of the teeth, tilt the saw, and watch the needle as it slid down the length of the saw. If it jumped out, he knew at least one tooth wasn't set correctly

That is a very cool idea!  I found that many of the tools to just do the set of the teeth are very easy to make up for ye-old-blacksmith types. If the set is off, it has made a difference in this one.  The saw is so rusty and pitted that I set the teeth out pretty far.  The filer's guide stated to make the set .009 of an inch for dry wood, but I pushed them out to .012 and the saw worked much better. 

 

 

Taking on doing these few was a pretty big task.  I only did about 1 -2 hours of filing at a time during days that I just wanted to forget about my real job. Just learning the little bit that I have about these old saws really makes me appreciate what kind of manufacturing process went into them and so many different tapers in so many directions! I've got a few chain saws around, however they are now collecting dust as I've grabbed the old single man saw more often to cut up what I need.  No gas or cords involved, not too much worry about a jumping a cut and cutting your leg off.  They also wake up some back muscles you never knew you had.

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