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Joshua States
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If you look at the historical pieces this is based on, they used multiple small pieces as well, and for the same reason.  It was hard to get large sheets of bronze before the invention of the rolling mill!

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Seriously. This is the scrap I have left from that 6x12 inch sheet.

 

Scrap bronze.jpg

 

How did they do it way back when?

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“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

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There is a lot left …and probably more akin to what they had to begin with back then…. 

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13 hours ago, Joshua States said:

How did they do it way back when?

 

Cast an ingot as thin as you can, hammer it to the required thickness.  I've seen Wallace Gusler do it with brass by pouring it onto a marble slab.  I bet Jeroen has a better way, though.

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I suppose you could make a clay mold and a clay crucible. Pour a sheet-like object using that tech. I don't think they had polished marble in the 6th C though......

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

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https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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Maybe I'll try melting this and casting an ingot......

 

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“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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11 hours ago, Joshua States said:

I suppose you could make a clay mold and a clay crucible. Pour a sheet-like object using that tech. I don't think they had polished marble in the 6th C though......

It's much harder then it sounds, particularly when you are going to make crucibles and moulds from clay. Forging iron is so much easier. Also brass is a tricky one to melt, without turning it into sticky goo. And don't breath in the fumes, zinc fumes are nasty. It is good fun though. 

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Jeroen Zuiderwijk

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9 hours ago, Jeroen Zuiderwijk said:

It's much harder then it sounds, particularly

Nobody said it was easy! :P

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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15 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Nobody said it was easy! :P

Just tempering expectations :) The most fun years I had casting were the first years just messing about. I didn't get many good results yet. But just playing around trying to melt and cast stuff was great. When you don't expect anything, any result is awesome. When you expect good results, you just get very frustrated at all the failures :) 

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Jeroen Zuiderwijk

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I've cold forged bronze sheet down thinner before I had my rolling mill, It is a lot of work but it can be done.

I imagine thin sheets would be bundled up and forged down together similar to how gold leaf is still made.

 

I would think you'd be surprised at the skill and technology of the metal casters in the ''dark age'' 

 

 

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21 hours ago, Pieter-Paul Derks said:

I've cold forged bronze sheet down thinner before I had my rolling mill, It is a lot of work but it can be done.

I imagine thin sheets would be bundled up and forged down together similar to how gold leaf is still made.

 

I would think you'd be surprised at the skill and technology of the metal casters in the ''dark age'' 

 

 

Not so much, but that's because I'm well aware of what they could do :) 

Edited by Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk

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Incidentally, if you ever watch Antiques Roadshow and see the appraisers looking at the brass drawer pull backplates (the "brasses," as they call them) on 17th and 18th century furniture, They're looking for evidence of cast-and-forged rather than rolled plate.  Hammer marks, porosity, uneven thickness, etc.   The better makers did try to file the brasses flat, and sometimes the only evidence is file marks on the back side, or a visibly crystalline texture.  There is almost always a tiny bit of porosity, often hard to find.  

 

If it's uniformly smooth and even, it's rolled, and thus a later replacement.

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