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Arc welding 6150


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I just destroyed my backhoe bucket. Sorry for being off topic but I would appreciate the metallurgical advice. After I get it V'ed out and re-welded I want to reinforce the backside. I have on hand 1084, some of that 6150 that is tapered edge to edge that was floating around some years back, a torsion bar from a tank unknown and could get hold of automotive leaf spring. Something tells me the 6150 is the best choice to toughen up the failure points? Pre-heat, post heat?  Good news was my two previous welds from a couple years back held. Welding advise, I have a 220 MIG and stick available. 

 

Yeah I'm rough on stuff!

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Matt Walker                https://www.youtube.com/@onedamascusmaker/videos

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Dang, Matt, how big was the rock? :lol:

 

The main bucket is A36 or 1020, but the scraper bar the teeth are welded to is probably T1 abrasion resistant plate.  The teeth themselves are something like that as well. 

 

I vote for that 6150 too, but no clue about welding it.  I'm sure preheat/postheat will be needed.

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You are looking for toughness and impact resistance so think more along hammer steels or AR steel. 4140 which is usually forklift tines I believe could be a good option.

 

6150 is probably the closest on your list and can be welded like normal plain steel you just need preheat and postheat with a slow cool down.

 

Basically get it up to temp I cant remember exactly off the top I think its 5-600 weld heat the whole thing back that temp around the weld and then slowly cool by torching it but not as long each time. basically you want the steel to contract slowly as possible.

Edited by Sean Blum
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What is your bucket manufacturer? As Alan said it can be A36 (more likely a "proprietary" derivative) but some can also be a big piece of AR360, AR400, or 1040 with either the same for the teeth with a different HT or something else.

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3 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

Dang, Matt, how big was the rock?

As you know It's worked lots of rocks that could have done this and may have started cracks but this was an old pine stump I thought was rotten but must have been solid in the center. Thanks for all the input guys. Since we are off topic anyway I bet some will like this video 

 

 

 

Matt Walker                https://www.youtube.com/@onedamascusmaker/videos

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On 1/17/2023 at 5:41 PM, Matt Walker said:

Since we are off topic anyway I bet some will like this video 

 

Yes. If it has "blasting" in the title, always yes.

 

Explain that rig. Never seen one like it.

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Based on 1/2 inch hole I can drill in 3 minutes with generator and Hilti drill. Even that expanding material needs a bigger hole like conventional blasting medium, requiring lots of air and heavy drill. 45 Long Colt full of smokeless powder or Pyrodex and capped off with epoxy dropped in  hole. The old air bottle just holds a spring that drops a firing pin in a tube when the string pulls keeper pin and provides enough weight to not blow out.  That was gen one here is gen 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4mcEvc2OyA . Same load, both systems had issues. I later went to cannon fuse and loose powder or Pyrodex pellets 50 cal. then electronic igniters proved to be better. Cannon fuse leaves a flaw in the packing as it burns away resulting in occasional ineffective blow outs but the wire stays in place. With the gen 2 system several shots would upset the 1/2 inch rod around the groove or hole for the keeper pin. Gen 1 had problems with bent and dirty tubes. I even made some tubes from O1 and HTd. Drilling a 1/4" inch hole in a 1/2" rod 11" long challenged my limited patience.

Matt Walker                https://www.youtube.com/@onedamascusmaker/videos

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Never would have thought a 45 long Colt case would hold enough powder to do that.  It's probably a good thing we aren't neighbors.  We'd have a lot of fun till one of us got hurt ;)

-Brian

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3 hours ago, Brian Dougherty said:

Never would have thought a 45 long Colt case would hold enough powder to do that.  It's probably a good thing we aren't neighbors.  We'd have a lot of fun till one of us got hurt ;)

Based on the colective hobbie here im not sure you would stop at "got hurt"

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Brandon Sawisch bladesmith

 

eagles may soar but weasels don't get sucked in to jet engines

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5 hours ago, Brian Dougherty said:

Never would have thought a 45 long Colt case would hold enough powder to do that.  It's probably a good thing we aren't neighbors.  We'd have a lot of fun till one of us got hurt ;)

Yeah Brian, Actually our limestone is much harder than some in other areas. Hard rock takes much less explosive powder than soft rock which absorbed the energy rather than fracturing efficiently. In a 1/2" hole 12 inches deep 2 teaspoons is plenty. A stump on the other hand would take a lot of powder. 

 

And yeah, you would fit in well around here. 

2 hours ago, dragoncutlery said:

Based on the colective hobbie here im not sure you would stop at "got hurt"

Maybe!

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Matt Walker                https://www.youtube.com/@onedamascusmaker/videos

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