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Why did it break


derekcrowley

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Never try to straighten a warp out of the quench, unless the blade is still pretty hot and you need a clamping system that will complete the quench by drawing the heat out pretty fast. Do all of your warp straightening after initial tempering cycles. Clamp the blade to a heavy and straight piece of steel using small shims to back-bend the warp out and retemper at the same heat as the original temper.

 

If you are going to clamp a blade out of the quench, this is is how I do it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWWtIAsIKGo

 

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

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Another problem could also be using water to quench.  Esp if its not heated.  It could have cracked your steel (gauging from the dark lines on the side view of the steel) and then broke the rest of the way from trying to straighten it.  I like to use heated canola oil for 1095.  Also with 1095 you want to quench it immediately after pulling it from the forge. 

Edited by Tim Cook
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2 hours ago, Tim Cook said:

Another problem could also be using water to quench.  Esp if its not heated.  It could have cracked your steel (gauging from the dark lines on the side view of the steel) and then broke the rest of the way from trying to straighten it.  I like to use heated canola oil for 1095.  Also with 1095 you want to quench it immediately after pulling it from the forge. 

Tracking on all, heated canola oil? Manufacturing specks say to quench in water tho and then temper 400 for 2hr twice … this is why I love forums everyone says don’t but people do haha. Thanks for the information the other two came out hard and did not crack or break 

thanks for the information but the the canola how hot does it need to be ? 

8 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Never try to straighten a warp out of the quench, unless the blade is still pretty hot and you need a clamping system that will complete the quench by drawing the heat out pretty fast. Do all of your warp straightening after initial tempering cycles. Clamp the blade to a heavy and straight piece of steel using small shims to back-bend the warp out and retemper at the same heat as the original temper.

 

If you are going to clamp a blade out of the quench, this is is how I do it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWWtIAsIKGo

 

It was still warm, looking back now I could have grind straight. The other two came out hard and I tempered so we will see thank you 

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3 hours ago, Tim Cook said:

Another problem could also be using water to quench.  Esp if its not heated.  It could have cracked your steel (gauging from the dark lines on the side view of the steel) and then broke the rest of the way from trying to straighten it.  I like to use heated canola oil for 1095.  Also with 1095 you want to quench it immediately after pulling it from the forge. 

another admin note -  water was garage temp ... but in florida right now its about 92 in the afternoon... how hot does the water need to be? i am thinking hotter due to the first one cracking but it heated the water up and the next two did not 

 

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8 hours ago, derekcrowley said:

It was still warm,

"warm" to me means you can hold it in your bare hand without trouble. That is too cold to clamp a hardened blade.

When I say "still hot" I mean around 400 degress F

 

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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Here is the TTT for 1095, from KnifeSteelNerds.  When blades are straightened out of the quench (before temper) it is done in the range on the bottom left where the word "Austenite" is.  Between about 800F and 400F (maybe as low as 350F), and usually it takes a few seconds to get there and know where any warps are, so more like starting at 600F and 10 second mark.  You then have a couple minutes and a couple hundred degrees to get it straight and cooled the rest of the way.  But good luck quenching it just enough and not too much without something like a molten salt quench.  This is much easier on alloys with more forgiving noses to the curve.  

1095-TTT1.jpg?resize=600%2C454&ssl=1

Edited by Jerrod Miller
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What Jerrod said......

 

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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Another thing that you could try is a brine solution.  It breaks up the vapor jacket that can cause uneven quenching.  Still another thing is a fast quenching oil like Parks #50.  It's a bit on the pricey side but it is designed for shallow hardening steels.  Also a deeper hardening steel like 8760 and warm canola oil might give better results.  Despite what you might read in some books, 1095 is not really a beginner's steel.

 

Doug

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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1 hour ago, Doug Lester said:

Another thing that you could try is a brine solution.  It breaks up the vapor jacket that can cause uneven quenching.  Still another thing is a fast quenching oil like Parks #50.  It's a bit on the pricey side but it is designed for shallow hardening steels.  Also a deeper hardening steel like 8760 and warm canola oil might give better results.  Despite what you might read in some books, 1095 is not really a beginner's steel.

 

Doug

Yea I read 1084 BUT I like a challenge lol … and I found 1095 easier I would like to get this right before moving on 

These worked 

IMG_1645.jpeg

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