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Coloured Glass


Will Robertson

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20231216_124226.jpg20231216_124243.jpgA Christmas gift made from home-made coloured glass - this is a full crystal with colours made from scratch at 770 °C (1420 °F) - the furnace was designed and built from scratch using refractory brick and a home-made insulating castable ceramic refractory with FeCrAl heating elements - software PID control and PWM modulation give temperature stability of +/- 0.5 °C - good for heat treating and melting some metals - I still want to make some improvements to the texture of the glass but getting there...

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Very cool. What are you using to make this?

 

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

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12 hours ago, Carlos Lara said:

Cool! Looks a lot like Shippo Yaki/Cloissoné enamel.

 

That's true! I think they achieved a very low melting point enamel by having a very high lead content. I like the out-of-control, feathery effect in this technique - the substrate was ceramic fiber paper but I'm gonna try and change to a sheet of 304 or one of the high temperature chrome steels to try and get a more table glass finish.

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8 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Very cool. What are you using to make this?

 

That's a full (24% Lead) crystal - in areas where lead is forbidden a Zinc Barium crystal could be used instead - I'll also have a go with recycled borosilicate glass - window glass or packaging glass can be used but it's made using lower quality sand so generally has limited clarity and unknown chemistry from materials thrown in to try to decolourise the iron in the sand. The colours here are Copper blue, Cobalt blue and a "Leaf Green" which comes from Chromium - other colours can come from the Lanthanides or from nanoparticle colloids in the glass.

 

I want to get a flatter texture on the back of the glass - I'd like to have a go with melting it on 304 or one of the higher temperature steels to achieve that.

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8 hours ago, Will Robertson said:

 

That's true! I think they achieved a very low melting point enamel by having a very high lead content. I like the out-of-control, feathery effect in this technique - the substrate was ceramic fiber paper but I'm gonna try and change to a sheet of 304 or one of the high temperature chrome steels to try and get a more table glass finish.

You're probably right. They only use a particular type of white clay powder, which probably has some lead in it, and a lot of the pigments they use also probably have a fair bit of lead in them (like Rokusho/malachite). 

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