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Steeled wrought iron Hawk


JenniferP

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I started this tomahawk as an entry into last years (2023) Ashoken competion..   Well, I ended up with Covid so did not go. 

I've been delving into manipulating the wrought iron to form patterns and this is the result.  

The wrought iron for this build came from a river and was part of the original hand railing that adorned the top of a stone archway bridge.  The bridge was washed out in the flood of 1938 in Gilbertville, MA 

I found a few bars of the hand railing at low water and this is the result. 

Farrier rasp for cutting edge.

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Great character in that wrought!  I'm hoping my most recent one turns out that clear.  Not ready to etch yet, though.  I do love seeing the uniform black steel against the kaleidoscope of wrought. 

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Alan, I left out a few of the artistic steps as I'm not ready for people to copy them yet..  

But....  If you look at both sides of the tommy you can see that the bars were stacked back to back the wrong way before welding..    Reason why I mention it is this.. One can arrange for the shimmer to light to dark striations once these are seen before the weld. 

These bars were extremely rusted and did not clean up at all.. Just welded them as they were..    

I love the pattern of the farrier rasp being preserved in the steel-to-wrought iron weld seam.  You can actually see the lines on one side and punch pulls on the other. 

Overall very happy with it..   Sadly in use the wrought iron pattern disappears so in some ways while fully functional, it's a wall hanger if one wants to keep it patina. 

Came out exactly as planned so that was a treat.. 

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2 hours ago, JenniferP said:

You can actually see the lines on one side and punch pulls on the other. 

I feel kind of silly not seeing that until you mentioned it, but that is indeed pretty cool.  

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Jerrod, it happens..   We are busy people and unless there is a strong enough contrast in vision we often miss many things..  

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Beautiful job!  I like the fact that you left some of the texture of the farrier's rasp in the finished product.

 

Doug

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HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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Thanks Doug.   Was an interesting project..  I really enjoy working with wrought iron.. 

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21 hours ago, JenniferP said:

love the pattern of the farrier rasp being preserved in the steel-to-wrought iron weld seam

 

That's always the best part of using wrought and files.  I did one a few years ago that shows this really well. Not to hijack your thread, but

 

whawkedge.jpg

 

That was wagon tire.  I like your iron better!  

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Alan, that is really neat.. Love the looks of the axe blade.. 

In 48yrs forging metal and using rasps the tommy shown is the first that retained the teeth..   It's only in the last 3 or 4 years that I use wrought iron more for axes and such. 

Do you think the wrought iron is prone to retain the tooth profile vs mild steels? 

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13 hours ago, JenniferP said:

Do you think the wrought iron is prone to retain the tooth profile vs mild steels? 

 

I do, because wrought is so much softer than 1095, even at welding heat.  

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It did finish out beautifully. I may be delusional, but I only see two bars of wrought in the initial weld form, but I see three in the finished hawk. Is that just an illusion?

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

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Thanks..   I did only use 2 bars..   I've been experimenting with wrought iron manipulation to get a desired pattern.. 

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That is a nice piece….nice forge work and white  work….  “ a user” look or  the  dramatic museum look …..  two different ways of looking at the world…. It is nice to see both i think …..the iron pattern doesn’t go away in a user  it just  takes a closer look to see it ….. some of that beauty is to me  in the  story of use  it tells…   

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@Dick Sexstone well said..  As a smith with many, many years behind me, I find the things that interest me are hidden in the cracks.   Very much in form and function and viability. 

My "steeled wrought iron" forging hammers come to mind.. The wrought iron being so soft that it wears just from putting the hammer on the anvil 1000x a day. 

As a friend who has been involved with the smithing trade born into it, as he says.. He is surrounded by beautiful things.. 

Pretty easy to see which side I prefer down..  The shine (polish on the steel) and the fact that the wrought iron is now a few thou below the steel to me is that "hidden gem in the crack"..  Most people won't ever see that even when looking at it. 

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