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Recurve knife design


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Hi! I have a new knife that I finished recently and I'm planning on making more to post on my website/social media. Before I do so I thought I'd as yalls opinion. It took me about a dozen blades to get one that I liked. It has a slight recurve on the blade. The I am not even sure what to classify this knife under. Edc? Hunter? Harpoon point? I've thought of a few names for it but haven't decided.

 

The knife itself is wicked sharp and holds a good edge. A slight convex grind with a leather platten The handle is waterbuck horn (i also posted this to fit and finish if this looks familiar) and pins are brass. I was wondering if anyone can see blatant flaws or some things I can fix in the design. I got two more on the bench right now.The sheath is 7/9 oz leather. Fits a 1 ½inch belt. 

 

 I was wondering if anyone can see blatant flaws or some things I can fix in the design. Any criteques are welcome :D

 

Cheers!

WFF

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Its a nice little knife.  If you are looking for critique, there are a couple of minor points that I think could be improved, but it is certainly acceptable as is.  Minor enhancements:

  1. I would consider wet sculpting the sheath to more closely match the blade profile and provide a "tighter" fit.  Currently it looks a bit generic.
  2. I'm not a big fan of the machine finish on the blade.  IMHO, one of the big differentiators for a custom hand forged and finished knife is that hand rubbed satin finish.
  3. The top section of your harpoon clip shifts from being straight to follow the curvature of the knife edge.  Aesthetically I would prefer to see it continuing straight.
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Thanks Dan! I agree with you on all of those. Hand sanding has always been an issue for me. I'm not patient enough with it. It usually takes me about a hour to get past a grit. Not sure if that is something I am doing wrong. What grit should I sand up to? I got a few more of the knives on the bench and I'll post them when I'm done. I'll try to adjust those. Thanks again, man! I really appreciate it!

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Dan saw exactly what I see.  

 

As for grits, it looks like you still have some 60 grit or coarser scratches.  The time to get those out is while you're still at the grinder.  What's your grit progression?  I know more than one professional maker who won't use anything rougher than 60 grit due to the difficulty of removing 36 grit scratches.  They (and I!) take the blade through at least 220 on the grinder.  The finer you go on the grinder the easier it is to hand sand the scratches out.  I often go to 400 on the grinder, then do a quick hand sand at 220. This will show any leftover scratches and is easily erased by hand sanding with 400 and up.  This is before HT.  

 

All that said, it's a nice little knife.  I like the handle material, and I'd call it a hunter/skinner. Good job on the plunges and the choil!

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When grinding or sanding the previous scratch marks out of the blade, good enough is not good enough.  Keep going until all the marks from the previous grit are gone before going on to the next highest grit.

 

Doug

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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And this takes a little practice to know where to stop with the coarser grits. Blades can get very thin very fast, and then you start losing width as the edge gets ground away.  

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I like to start coarse, I bought some 24 grit ceramic as an experiment, and that will hog some steel, but it is hard to get clean after that.  My usual is 36, 60, HT, back to 36 to get down to near final thickness, 60, 220, three grits of gator (finishing at 220 equivalent).  Then I start to hand sand, 150 to start (that gets into the corners and gets those pesky scratches), 320, 600, 1200, and sometimes up to 1500.  I love the look of a solid 150/220 surface and that is where I stop to start handles and furniture.  Then a quick 220 pass to get any bench marks, everything else goes fast once I have that foundation down. 

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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Ok. I'll try that.i was using a worn 36 to hog material before ht then after ht 120 ceramic, 220 sc, 320 sc, 600 sc, fine scotch Brite, cork and then back to fine scotch Brite. I guess I didn't spend enough time removing grind marks. I probably doesn't help that most of my belts are super dull lol

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Posted (edited)

Screenshot_20240312_091702_Gallery.jpgScreenshot_20240312_091710_Gallery.jpgScreenshot_20240312_091714_Gallery.jpgScreenshot_20240312_091719_Gallery.jpgScreenshot_20240312_091723_Gallery.jpgScreenshot_20240312_091736_Gallery.jpgHere are some better pictures and some more knives I've made from the same design. I believe I adjusted the scratches on some of them. Still a belt finish but I believe they improved. Thoughts?

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Edited by Emery White
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Sorry it looks like they didn't send the first time

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Did they go thru this time? 

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Yep, I see 'em now.

 

The one with the patina looks good!  The rest still look unfinished to me.  Try using 3m Trizact CF belts. Start with A160 grit after your last regular belt, then go to A60 followed by A45. That will go quickly, and leave you with a lineless satin polish.  A quick hand sand at 400 will really make it pop afterwards.

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48 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

The one with the patina looks good!  The rest still look unfinished to me.  Try using 3m Trizact CF belts. Start with A160 grit after your last regular belt, then go to A60 followed by A45. That will go quickly, and leave you with a lineless satin polish.  A quick hand sand at 400 will really make it pop afterwards.

I agree with Alan and I will add something. I have a hard time judging when the previous scratch lines are gone when I'm going machine only. Something I have started doing is once I *think* I am done with a grit on the machine, I take the blade to the bench and, using the same grit I just did on the grinder, go over the blade length wise (handle to tip) with hand sand paper. Any remaining previous grit marks show up IMMEDIATLY!. Then you can take them down with hand sanding, or go back to the machine. Has really sped up the hand sanding process. You can do the same thing with the Trizact belts Alan mentioned (which give a great finish!); just look for the grit" equivalent on line. 

 

https://www.thesandpaperman.com.au/abrasive-conversion-chart.html

 

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