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How thin is TOO thin for a spine? (1095 spring temper .035 stock)


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Hello guys, gals, folks and friends- after a 3 year abscence I am finally able to move into an official "Shop Space" and wanted to reach out as I geared up for my first projects... I hope all have been well-safe and as always, at peace! It feels absolutely surreal to be able to make stuff again and looking forward to learning and hopefully contributing once Im online and geared up again.

 

So- Was given a 10 foot length of 1095 at a blue-spring temper that is only .035 thick. Stock came from McMaster Carr- and I have 1095 packing slip so its a "known" alloy not a scrappers-delight... 

 

I realize 1095 is not the optimal choice to learn on- but free is free and if its a tough mistress to learn from at least the lessons will be "Learning failures" 

 

Considering using this for small carving blades for Kolrosing and Detail Carvng blades and possibly a few 2.5-3 inch Sloyd Greenwood blades.

 

Really hoping for input on any special considerations from the wiser minds here regarding this stock size- I may have a decent supply of this at a reduced price moving forward... 

 

3 Questions please:

 

1- Just stock removal as the stock is already so thin???  Do I need to normalize and then re-heat treat this? (Any special considerations due to thinness?) PS- I do have a Heat Treat Oven so controlled time/temps are achievable- just havent got the oven online yet.

 

2- Blade ideas for this thin of stock???

 

3- Any good for fillet knives? (outside the fact that O1 and 1095 will rust at the SIGHT of water...)

 

As always- any suggestions are appreciated and I look forward to "Working thin" thought processes... 

 

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Welcome back!  

 

1. Spring temper will be a bit soft for a carving blade.  You'll probably want to redo the HT.

 

2. That's pretty thin, but carving knives and Sloyd knives would be a good use.  Or leatherworking blades, anything that needs to be thin and delicate.  

 

3. I think you answered your own question there. 

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Thanks Alan- it literally FEELS good to be back- I had to be the "ask-hole" for years due to not having a decent shop space of my own and acquiring knowledge while tramping in other shops... Now a few bits and bobs are in place...

 

Jumping into the 1095 normalizing and annealing research next- want to get these things on the go asap so gotta learn before the burn!

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 4/7/2024 at 7:09 AM, Kerri Duncan said:

Jumping into the 1095 normalizing and annealing research next- want to get these things on the go asap so gotta learn before the burn!

https://cashenblades.com/2021/02/08/1095/

 

That will get you everything you need to know.

 

I know what I would do with that steel, depending on how wide it is. I would stack that up with some 15N20 and make pattern weld billets out of it. The layer count would be really high realy fast.

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

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11 hours ago, Joshua States said:

I know what I would do with that steel, depending on how wide it is. I would stack that up with some 15N20 and make pattern weld billets out of it. The layer count would be really high realy fast.

If I were doing this, I'd double up the 1095. 
In my experience, the 15N20 moves less during forging, and the thinnest saw blades (15N20) I've ever gotten have been 0.072" so that would make for some pretty thin dark layers.

RIP Bear....be free!

 

as always

peace and love

billyO

 

 

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My standard 15N20 is .063" thick. Yes, the product is inverse from what we normally see in PW where the dark is often thicker than the shiny.

Still, even doubling the 1095 to match the 15N20, a 2" thick billet is around 32 layers visually. If you can fit 2.5 inches in your forge, that's 50 layers. Two welding cycles and you are at 150-200 layers.

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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