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Ingot reduction by press or hammer


owen bush
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Hi ,I am a blacksmith and blade smith in uk and this is my first real post on this site.

I have A question abouh how to forge down a bloom of (hopefully) wootz.one of the chaps on the british blades forum (colin) has managed to cast a 10lb ingot of "wootz" and is coming over to my forge to bash it into shape.

Now assuming that the steel has the potential to become usable what would be the best way to reduce this .I have read many of the posts you have written and it seems that slow and low is the way , with no guarantees at that .

I have a couple of spring hammers 60lb and150 lb and a 200 tone press that we can use as well as a nice rack of sledge hammeres (wich id like to leave in the rack!!)

What advice would anybody give as Id be most greatfull to anybody who has any to offer

should we cut it up ?

slow press and then gentle hammer?

weld a handle on ?

what orientation would be best to cut it and forge it?

 

many thanks Owen

forging soul in to steel

 

owenbush.co.uk

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yesh...don't look at me... ...i'm all hand hammers... .... although its traditional, it's also tedious, and labour intensive

 

Ric would definitely have a good idea which is best (powerhammer or press or mill)

 

personally....i believe you still need many heat/hammer cycles for a nice pattern.... regardless of method...

 

Greg

 

 

hopefully other more mechanically inclined folks will chime in ;)

Edited by Greg Thomas Obach
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Method one: very light almost gentle squeezes or taps maybe 1/32 of an inch at a time. Plan on spending a good deal of time and lots of heats making very small bites. If the bloom starts to crack you can grind out the crack(s) or move to method two. If it does not crack continue gently squeezing it into a consolidated mass. You should be able to feel it acting like a steel billet after a while and then it will forge like any other piece.

 

Method two: squeeze the stuff until it's very flat plates coins or chunks. Stack them up and weld them all together, cut and fold like any other billet of welded materials until it begins to consolidate and act like a regular bar of steel.

 

Either way works. I watched Ric do the little squeeze thing and he definitely has the touch. Me I like to squash make flat.

There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves. Will Rogers

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Method one:  very light almost gentle squeezes or taps maybe 1/32 of an inch at a time.  Plan on spending a good deal of time and lots of heats making very small bites.  If the bloom starts to crack you can grind out the crack(s) or move to method two.  If it does not crack continue gently squeezing it into a consolidated mass.  You should be able to feel it acting like a steel billet after a while and then it will forge like any other piece. 

 

Method two:  squeeze the stuff until it's very flat plates coins or chunks.  Stack them up and weld them all together, cut and fold like any other billet of welded materials until it begins to consolidate and act like a regular bar of steel. 

 

Either way works.  I watched Ric do the little squeeze thing and he definitely has the touch.  Me I like to squash make flat.

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No complaints with what Mike said.

You need to fully soak the ingot and do not get above 1900F. Do not push too hard no matter what method you choose. Grind out any cracks you see and continue.

I weld a handle on.

Expect to spend the whole day at this.

 

What is the chem of the material?

 

Ric

Richard Furrer

Door County Forgeworks

Sturgeon Bay, WI

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thank you for all your advice.

We had a go gently gently and it all turned to cheese .i guess that this is sometimes the way !

 

anyhow thanks

forging soul in to steel

 

owenbush.co.uk

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