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Arik Estus

wrought iron or?

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I final got a spectro reading. Of 6 tests, these are the 2 most divergant. So an average can be taken from these figures.

 

1. C 0.200 Mn 0.797 Si 0.220 P .00922 Cr 0.501 Ni 0.416 Mo 0.156 Al 0.0289

2. C 0.266 Mn 0.875 Si 0.0385 P 0.131 Cr .00364 Ni .00413 Mo 0.0145 Al .00264

 

1. Alsol 0.029 Alins .00297 As .00489 B .00045 Co .00969 Cu 0.143 Nb .00163

2. Also .00286 Alins .00006 As .00301 B .00152 Co .00176 Cu .00940 Nb .00130

 

1. Pb .00090 Sn .00837 Ti .00070 V .00487 W .00780 N .00900 Fe 97.46 Pims 1.0

2. Pb .00090 Sn .00050 Ti .00070 V .0106 W .00780 N .00900 Fe 98.47 Pims 0.9

 

Any opinions or questions.

 

Edit to insert the Sulf that I didnt put in. I am not a typist and hate transcribing.

 

1. S 0.0289 2. S .117

Edited by Arik Estus

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Did you mean iron ore, or iron "or" something else? From the analysis it appears to be plain old 1020 mild steel, unless there's strings of slag running through it.

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There's a LOT of slag running through it.

The instant I saw this “analysis” of the iron I’ve been selling on here, I knew right away there was about to be a can of worms opened, if it hadn’t been done already, so I decided I had better sit down and write this up before things got out of hand.

Firstly, I’m a knife maker, not a metallurgist. So, keep that in mind if you qualify yourself as one! (metallurgist)

I certainly can’t vouch for the analysis. Why the stuff is in it that is in it, I have no idea. I doubt if anyone else will either. I know I have been using it for two years with great results, along with about 50 other knife makers and blacksmiths.

When I first acquired this, I knew nothing about it and began my research.

It was manufactured in 1903. I also learned that for all practical purposes, the last actual manufacturing of wrought iron was in the ‘70s in Sweden. As a result of the resurrection of modern blacksmithing, there are now a few places on the planet doing it again.

Keep in mind that this stuff was made in 1903. We all know that at the turn of the century all types of advancements were being made in many aspects of our lives. Steel was one of them. I even learned that from the beginning of iron manufacturing, not only from one country to the next, but from one day to the next in the same foundry, the recipes were not consistent.

Raw materials were not consistent. Sources varied. Etc.

All types of "improvements" and additives were attempted to get longer life out of the material.

Why this stuff has in it what it has, I have no idea, and the people who made it are all gone.

Cut it, forge weld it, etch it. It’s wrought iron.

I have no idea why it has 9 thousandths of a percent of copper, or 4 thousandths of a percent of nickel. I don't even care! Maybe it was just the piece that was tested. Maybe it was something new they were trying that day!?!?!

Here’s a nice little dissertation from the Wrought Iron Advisory Council – “Wrought iron owes its rust proof properties to its fibrous nature. In modern terms, the refining of iron is a crude process, and results in the inclusion of non~corrodible slags in the structure of the metal. These slags, and the softness of the material when hot, led to an ease of working by hand which gave rise to a great art form. Wrought Ironwork.”

Here is the link, which I suggest for fun reading! http://www.realwroughtiron.com/wiac.htm

I know that at one time, somebody starting adding to steel small quantities of other ingredients and all of a sudden we had “Stainless Steel.”! Look at what we have today. A large array of different steels with quite varying recipes, yet we still call them all “Stainless Steel”.

Thus it is with “wrought iron”, which includes pig iron, puddle iron, wrought iron, etc.

Is this stuff iron? Guarenteed.

Was it wrought? Absolutely.

One of its innate abilities is the ability to forge weld it upon itself. I’ve got guys making tomahawks with it. Forge welding it to itself as a result of the slag content.

Cut up a few pieces on the band saw and watch the piles of slag appear on the table!

I have a bunch of the material in its raw state with forge welded loops in it.

All I can tell you is that it is a heck of a lot of fun to work with, and there isn’t much left.

It looks nice when polished and etched and even blues rather well.

I only hope I can supply even more makers with some rather unique material.

 

 

 

 

Did you mean iron ore, or iron "or" something else?  From the analysis it appears to be plain old 1020 mild steel, unless there's strings of slag running through it.

39559[/snapback]

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Ah! :)

 

There, you see, I did not have enough info to go on at first. Yes, wrought has many, many things in it besides iron, most of which are natural constituents of the ore. I have some analyses of iron ore from mines in upper East TN that show a pretty similar range and amount of other odd "stuff" besides iron. I did not in any way mean to imply that KBA's wrought is not wrought iron, I was just going from the basic analysis of materials which said nothing about slag inclusions. Since I now know what we're talking about, yes, it is indeed wrought iron. No question or doubt about it. B)

 

All steels and irons have "tramp" elements in them that come from the ore itself, the previous contents of the smelter, the atmosphere of the furnace durning smelting, and so on. In the amounts they are present, they serve absolutely no purpose and have no effect on the material. If you look at a chart of average crustal abundance of all elements, you will often find that iron ores actually have less of these things than the surrounding rocks and soils! I was all excited about the vanadium content of a local ore body until I found out there was more vanadium in a spoonful of dirt from anywhere in the world, on average, than there was in my ore. :lol:

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Cool!

This is REALLY! fun stuff to work with and I did not in anyway want anyone to get confused about this material.

Thanks.

Karl B. Andersen

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Cool!

This is REALLY! fun stuff to work with and I did not in anyway want anyone to get confused about this material.

Thanks.

Karl B. Andersen

39572[/snapback]

 

 

Hi Karl,

The thing I have a problem with is the hardness of the metal itself. The two samplles I cut off, 1 7/8 and 1x4 to take in for spectrographic reading, took over a half hour to cut thru with my chop saw. Initialy I was sliceing a piece to make a gaurd out of. But it was so damn hard I got to wondering just what was in it. I have some other WI that sliced like butter. Zip and it was cut. This stuff doesnt cut easy at all.

Arik

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.

The two samplles I cut off, 1 7/8 and 1x4 to take in for spectrographic reading, took over a half hour to cut thru with my chop saw. Initialy I was sliceing a piece to make a gaurd out of. But it was so damn hard I got to wondering just what was in it. I have some other WI that sliced like butter. Zip and it was cut. This stuff doesnt cut easy at all.

 

That would be the slag acting up on you. Good slaggy wrought will strip the teeth off a hacksaw in no time, because the slag is in fact glass! Well, iron silicate glass, pretty much the mineral olivine. I guess it gums up cutoff wheels too.

 

Is your chopsaw an abrasive one or a bandsaw?

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That is lovely stuff to work with very tight and even grain.I didn't find it very hard at all I can zip through pretty fast with 41/2" x 1/16" cutoff wheels on my side grinder.The samples I got were 1/2"x 4".

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I initially got one heck of a supply of this stuff about a year ago. I can only ask you to imagine how much I've cut up! I've cut up probably 3000 pounds of this in varying dimensions and haven't had to fight it yet!

I cut the stuff I sent you!

14" Dewalt cut off saw. A few seconds.

The 1X4 stuff is a really hefty chunk of material, no matter what it's made of. That size might actually take me 2 or 3 minutes because my breaker keep popping off! and I spend 1/2 my time re-setting it!

I do not understand your 1/2 hour comment at all!

What kind of saw and blade combo are you using?

 

 

Hi Karl,

The thing I have a problem with is the hardness of the metal itself. The two samplles I cut off,  1 7/8 and 1x4 to take in for spectrographic reading, took over a half hour to cut thru with my chop saw. Initialy I was sliceing a piece to make a gaurd out of. But it was so damn hard I got to wondering just what was in it. I have some other WI that sliced like butter. Zip and it was cut. This stuff doesnt cut easy at all.

Arik

39657[/snapback]

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It cut for me real fast on the band saw and I run it at the slowest speed. It also forges real nice, if it forges like wrought and looks like it when etched then it will work for me.

 

I bought some "wrought" iron from website that was nothing more then mild steel. It had a small amount of carbon spark, forged like mild steel and no pattern on etching. It did not smell like wrought when I was cutting it. The company refused to refund me for it and now I have filed a complaint for false advertising. They did take the page they advertised it on off line. I wasted $3.50 a pound on a ten pound order with something I could have bought at the hardware store. JERKS!!!!

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