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deker

The grinder build begins....

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Just to make it easy on myself im going to try to post it as i got alot of Pm wanting the details, with Dons permission. The plans were given to me by a good friend of mine, Ron Duncan a maker from Cairo Mo and a hell of a guy. Good luck

 

 

 

Awesome! Thanks. I'll have to redesign mine a bit, but that's not too far off from what I have already. Oh yeah, and you can ignore the kneejerk PM I sent when I read your first post before scrolling down :)

 

Thanks,

 

-d

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Awesome! Thanks. I'll have to redesign mine a bit, but that's not too far off from what I have already. Oh yeah, and you can ignore the kneejerk PM I sent when I read your first post before scrolling down :)

 

Thanks,

 

-d

42235[/snapback]

Its nothing special really but sometimes pictures are better then words, as you see it has side to side and up and down, makes micro adjustmets. Once the side to side are adjusted they dont need moved generally and it works like a single adjustment tracking from there on

Edited by sdcb27

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Back into the shop this weekend! So, without further ado, here's what I was up to this Saturday...

 

 

34) Measure, mark, drill and tap the tooling arm lock hole

 

I set this 2" from the front of the tooling arm box so that I could get maximum arm extension for small wheel attachments and the like.

 

DSCN0193.JPG

 

You've seen me drill and tap a bunch of holes by now, so I'm saving the bandwidth on those pictures.

 

35) Do a little "Seat Of The Pants Engineering" for a tracking mechanism.

 

First principle of SOTPE: Use what you got first! So, I decided to start with a piece of the tooling arm box I screwed up before. First I cut a 2" piece off of the end.

 

DSCN0194.JPG

 

This piece was extra convenient because it already had holes to mount it with and holes that removed some material I had to take off anyways.

 

36) Cut off the edges to make a center tab for a hinge

 

A couple of cuts with the bandsaw and it starts to look more like half of a hinge.

 

DSCN0195.JPG

 

Set up for a little filing and grinding...

 

DSCN0196.JPG

 

and afterwards...

 

DSCN0197.JPG

 

Hrmmm...the countersink cut on the other side may get in the way when we need to cut the hole for the hinge pin though...

 

DSCN0198.JPG

 

This looks a little better.

 

DSCN0199.JPG

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37) Drill a hole for a hinge pin.

 

Again, you've seen plenty of this by now...Oh wait, you didn't see this part...

 

DSCN0200.JPG

 

Remember the part where I said "always make sure things are level"? I should have taken my own advice... :lol:

 

For the next try, leave one side on to make it easier to keep level.

 

DSCN0201.JPG

 

This looks a lot better.

 

DSCN0202.JPG

 

38) Cut off the other end, grind, file, etc.

 

39) Start getting the idler arm ready

 

Remember the original tooling arm box sides? Seems to me it'll make a good idler arm, and it already has at least one useful mounting hole drilled and tapped.

 

DSCN0203.JPG

 

Now, drill and tap the second hole. I just used the hinge piece as a guide for drilling and left it in place to tap the hole.

 

DSCN0204.JPG

 

40) Start hinge piece #2

 

Start with another piece of the old tooling arm box

 

DSCN0205.JPG

 

41) Remove the center section of the second hinge tab.

 

I'd love to have a mill to do this, but since I don't, it's time for the tried and true "drill some holes and cut the rest out" method.

 

DSCN0206.JPG

 

DSCN0207.JPG

 

42) Grind and file to fit.

 

DSCN0208.JPG

 

DSCN0209.JPG

 

DSCN0210.JPG

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42) Round the edges off so that the hinge can articulate.

 

DSCN0211.JPG

 

DSCN0212.JPG

 

DSCN0213.JPG

 

43) Drill a 1/2" hole for the idler shaft

 

DSCN0214.JPG

 

44) Mark the section to remove for the idler arm support

 

This didn't show up too well, but if you look closely you can see a rectangular area marked out for removal.

 

DSCN0215.JPG

 

45) Drill the hole for the idler arm pivot

 

DSCN0217.JPG

 

46) Do some more drill, cut, grind and file magic

 

DSCN0218.JPG

 

47) Mark and drill pivot hole in idler arm

 

Note that I set this all together with the idler arm sitting on a piece of 1/8" thick stock I had laying around to leave some extra space for the arm to pivot. Then I marked and drilled this hole and put a bolt through it.

 

DSCN0219.JPG

 

48) Drill a hole for the tracking adustment screw

 

Didn't snap a pic of this, but it's just a hole drilled and tapped to line up with the back of the idler shaft bolt. This will allow setting the tracking by moving the hinge in and out.

 

So that's about it for now. Of course I have to redo most of it after sdcb27's post ;) I've got pulleys, a driveshaft, and a platen attachment ordered from Rob Frink which should be shipping out tomorrow. More once I have all that stuff!

 

-d

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Derek

 

Its project is each better time.

 

Congratulations. :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy:

 

Abraços do Brazil.

 

Alessandro Andreotti

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More parts updates.

 

I just ordered a variable speed setup from a local company. Within a week I should have an ACTech SM220S Variable Frequency Drive (good up to a 2HP motor, runs on 230V. I have to install a breaker and an outlet in the garage sub-panel now...) and a brand spankin' new 1.5HP Baldor TEFC motor to go with it. I got a bonus at work and decided to splurge on the drive system. It's CERTAINLY the most expensive part of this whole build, but if the hype is to be believed it's a good investment.

 

The best part though is that I'm saving money by using a local company. These folks wanted a lot less for the VFD than other online sources. It's the best of both worlds for me. I get to support a local business AND save some cash.

 

Now for some math...

 

My drive wheel will be 4" in diameter

The motor is 1750RPM

The VFD will allow from 0 to 4x motor speed RPM (though the guy recommends not going under 800RPM for any extended period and simliar restrictions on the high end...let's say no more than 3x or 5250RPM)

 

So, applying a little geometry we get a circumference of 12.56" on my drive pulley (C = Pi * d) which works out to just a hair over 1 Surface Foot of belt per revolution of the pulley. This makes my math EASY.

 

Minimum recommended speed: 12.56 * 800 = 10,048 / 12 = 837.3333 SFPM

Maximum recommended speed: 12.56 * 5250 = 65,940 / 12 = 5,495 SFPM

 

With the right belts I should be able to turn a hunk of steel to dust in no time flat, or gently polish to a mirror finish. That's the idea anyways...

 

More updates as I get more parts...

 

-d

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This grinder build is a great post and has caused me to think about the least labor-intensive way to build the toolbox. This is just my humble opinion, but how about buying a 24’’class III trailer towing receiver tube with an OD of 2.53 and a 1/4” wall for 24 dollars from your local steel supplier. Then buy @ approximately $25.00 a 2”x 20” piece of cold rolled steel for the tool arm with an OD of 2.OO. The ID of the receiver tub is 2.03 for a perfect fit and you could fabricate the majority of the pieces together by taking your time and welding them. I hope this helps, see enclosed photo.

 

 

Dennis k

 

 

 

receiver_tube.jpg

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This grinder build is a great post and has caused me to think about the least labor-intensive way to build the toolbox.  This is just my humble opinion, but how about buying a 24’’class III trailer towing receiver tube with an OD of 2.53 and a 1/4” wall for 24 dollars from your local steel supplier.  Then buy @ approximately $25.00 a 2”x 20” piece of cold rolled steel for the tool arm with an OD of 2.OO.  The ID of the receiver tub is 2.03 for a perfect fit and you could fabricate the majority of the pieces together by taking your time and welding them.  I hope this helps, see enclosed photo.         

                   

     

Dennis k

 

Dennis,

 

That's genius! I hadn't even thought of that! Of course, I was blinded by concentrating on a bunch of pictures of KMGs :)

 

-d

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This grinder build is a great post and has caused me to think about the least labor-intensive way to build the toolbox.  This is just my humble opinion, but how about buying a 24’’class III trailer towing receiver tube with an OD of 2.53 and a 1/4” wall for 24 dollars from your local steel supplier.  Then buy @ approximately $25.00 a 2”x 20” piece of cold rolled steel for the tool arm with an OD of 2.OO.  The ID of the receiver tub is 2.03 for a perfect fit and you could fabricate the majority of the pieces together by taking your time and welding them.  I hope this helps, see enclosed photo.         

receiver_tube.jpg

42351[/snapback]

 

I mount all sorts of tools to 2” receiver stock so that I can strap them down relatively solidly when I need to (to the back of the truck). I’ve been thinking of removing my vice mount on my bench and then adding a receiver (welded to a big, flat plate that you can screw to the bottom of the bench top) at either end of my bench so I can move the vice to where I want it, and maybe even do something similar to my 55lb anvil…

 

Rob, I honestly still don’t get why this thing is all solid steel stock, but since you seem to have found a source for it fairly cheap, well go for it.

 

As far as the funny cut with the bandsaw, I have the same one and it’s funny, sometimes I can get perfect cuts and sometimes I get stuff that looks a little like that (never quite that bad). I was able to put perfect cuts in some exhaust pipe and slicing apart some AN-4 fittings (if you’re not familiar, some little tiny aluminum fittings used on race cars). One thing to definitely try, a piece like that you should be cutting from end to end not across the wide side.

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Deker post #48, the fabrication of an idler tracking hinge assembly is identical to a Mercedes car door hinge and 2003 Chevy full size truck wield-on door hinge. The Mercedes hinge is a bolt on and extremely strong. I hope this gives you folks something to think about.

 

Dennis K

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Rob, I honestly still don’t get why this thing is all solid steel stock, but since you seem to have found a source for it fairly cheap, well go for it. 

 

I looked at the KMG and it never occurred to me that it was anything but steel :) Once I got going I realized it'd be a bit heavy, but I've decided that the weight gives me two bonuses. 1) The extra weight should help cut down on any vibration and 2) It'll be darned near theft-proof. If somebody is willing to try and carry the thing, it'll slow 'em down enough for me to get a good sight picture :)

 

As far as the funny cut with the bandsaw, I have the same one and it’s funny, sometimes I can get perfect cuts and sometimes I get stuff that looks a little like that (never quite that bad).  I was able to put perfect cuts in some exhaust pipe and slicing apart some AN-4 fittings (if you’re not familiar, some little tiny aluminum fittings used on race cars).  One thing to definitely try, a piece like that you should be cutting from end to end not across the wide side.

42372[/snapback]

 

I think I got it MOSTLY taken care of with some fidgeting around with the alignment bearings, belt tracking, etc. It runs a lot straighter now. Not perfect, but a lot better. Once I have the grinder going I can fix any crooked cuts that way :)

 

-d

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Deker post #48, the fabrication of an idler tracking hinge assembly is identical to a Mercedes car door hinge and 2003 Chevy full size truck wield-on door hinge. The Mercedes hinge is a bolt on and extremely strong. I hope this gives you folks something to think about.

 

Dennis  K

 

If only I knew where the junkyards are here in the new neighborhood....I need to take more time to scavenge...

 

Also, mini-update for today. I got my parts from Rob Frink! Can't post pics tonight, but I'll try to soon. Everything looks awesome. I'm coming down the home stretch now. All I need is a few nuts & bolts, a spring, a shaft for the 10" wheel, and a little time...Oh, and I have to install a 230V breaker in the garage.....Hopefully within a week or so...

 

-d

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Just to drop a quick note... I'm almost done! I have a mess of pictures to post from my weekend of work on the grinder. I'll try to get pics resized and posted tonight.

 

-d

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So, I got a LOT done this weekend, but I was fixated on working so I missed some process pictures. By this point though you all know what drilling a hole or two looks like :) I'll just show you what I did and discuss what's happening.....On we go...

 

49) Get the bearings set up for the contact wheel

 

This was simply a piece of 4" x 1/2" flat 5" long. I drilled 2 holes through the top of the tooling arm and tapped them 3/8-16. Then I drilled and countersunk a couple of holes to attach the plate to the top of the tooling arm, and some more holes tapped 3/8-16 to mount bearings. The result looks like this:

 

DSCN0185_001.JPG

 

You can see how it attaches to the arm here:

 

DSCN0186_001.JPG

 

I also drilled 2 holes on the side of the tooling arm 1-1/2" apart (on center) to attach the platen from Rob. They were drilled with a 27/64" bit and tapped with a 1/2-13 tap. When you have holes going in two directions, make sure that you set them up to not intersect...In reality I'll likely just have a second tooling arm since attaching the contact wheel attachment is a bit of a pain.

 

50) Go visit a friend and get more parts made....

 

I went to visit the shop of a friend from my blacksmith guild who helped me get some more parts made.

 

51) Make a driveshaft for the contact wheel.

 

DSCN0184_001.JPG

 

The shaft started as a piece of a larger shaft that we cut off. It was about 1", then had 1-1/4" or so section that was partially threaded. We chucked it up in the lathe and Walt very patiently explained and showed me how to run everything so I could cut the ends down to about .749" to fit in the 3/4" holes we had in the bearings and the contact wheel. We left a shoulder for the wheel to tighten up against. Then Walt cut the threads at the end of the shaft at 10 TPI on the lathe. Since it's an easy thing to screw up I let him handle cutting the threads. It took 8 or 10 passes of thread cutting to get the threads deep enough. We took a file to the tops of the threads so they wouldn't be sharp. Then we took the threads off of the end of the shaft so that they wouldn't get messed up if it got dropped etc. After that Walt took a piece of 2" aluminum round and cut a reallly nice thick washer for between the wheel and the nut. I learned a LOT during this section of work. I decided that I definitely need a lathe. While we waited for the machine to cut, Walt showed me various pieces of tooling, projects he had worked on, jigs he had made for his projects, etc. He's a truly knowledgable man who really just likes to teach.

 

Here's what it looks like all assembled:

 

DSCN0188_001.JPG

 

DSCN0189_001.JPG

 

DSCN0190_001.JPG

 

52) Square up drive shaft bearing mounts

 

The drive bearing mounts sat a little crooked, so Walt set them up in his little horizontal milling machine and faced the edges with a fly cutter. If you've never seen a fly cutter with a single bit, you've missed out on something truly scary. Imagine a tool steel cutter at a 45 degree angle to the work, spinning rapidly and throwing smoking chips in every direction. Neat to watch, scary to think what might happen if you took too much of a bite and broke the bit...Here you can see the nice swirl pattern the fly cutter left when the edges got trued up.

 

DSCN0194_001.JPG

 

53) Drill holes for drive shaft mounting

 

This is pretty self-explanatory. It helped that Walt has drill bits up into and beyond huge at his shop...

 

DSCN0192_001.JPG

 

Once I got home I tapped the holes to mount the bearings.

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Hey, I'm glad to see its comming together. I'll have to see it once it's done. I'm moving back to MD so I can work and make some $$ because none of my credits transfer to my new college. So I should be at the upcomming meetings.

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Hey, I'm glad to see its comming together.  I'll have to see it once it's done.  I'm moving back to MD so I can work and make some $$ because none of my credits transfer to my new college.  So I should be at the upcomming meetings.

42681[/snapback]

 

That was only half the update! I got tired and went to bed...It really is almost done!

 

Glad to hear you'll be back with us if only for a while. At the last meeting D. Morgan was showing folks a picture of a Moran-style clip point that is what we're supposed to try and duplicate for the knife contest for blacksmith days. I'll try and find the pic for you so you can get started once you're back home :)

 

-d

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54) Tap holes in the rear bearing supports

 

Same procedure as usual, but I want to point out one important thing. Since this is tapping with the piece flat, make sure you level in both directions like this:

 

DSCN0202_001.JPG

 

DSCN0203_001.JPG

 

I also don't know if it matters, but I started tapping from he side I would be screwing the bolts in from.

 

55) Set up the idler tension spring

 

This changed a bit over time, so the pics aren't all accurate in their timeline, but by putting them out of order I can save you extra steps I had to take :)

 

I grabbed an 8" carriage bolt, some washers and nuts, and an 8" compression spring from my local Tractor Supply Co. Then I drilled a 1/2" hole in the idler arm, dropped a washer and spring on the bolt, shoved it through the 1/2" hole and capped it off with another washer and nut. Looked kinda' like this:

 

DSCN0195_001.JPG

 

Later modifications were to grind the thread off of the portion of the bolt inside the spring since they caught on the spring and drill a second 1/2" hole in the arm and file out the center to it could slide and not bind in the arm.

 

DSCN0215_001.JPG

 

The carrage bolt head tended to slide forward and bind up, so I figured a stop to keep it from sliding forward was in order. I took another scrap of the old tooling arm box top and drilled and filed it into this shape:

 

DSCN0211_001.JPG

 

Then I reamed the holes out with a 27/64" drill bit to give the 3/8" bolts a little play, grabbed some 2" bolts and set it up like this:

 

DSCN0213_001.JPG

 

DSCN0214_001.JPG

 

56) Assemble for initial tracking test

 

I don't have any belts, so I'm using loops of 3/4" wide masking tape...s'what I had around...

 

DSCN0204_001.JPG

 

At this point tracking worked pretty well. And it started to look like a grinder!

 

57) Update the tracking mechanism

 

After seeing the pics from sdcb27, I decided my tracking assembly should be more like his. In chatting about it with Walt, we decided that I could just flip my current setup around to save time in making a new one. I drilled and tapped a hole at 1/2-13 for wheel mounting on the "new" bottom piece.

 

DSCN0197_001.JPG

 

To perform the adjustment, I grabbed a scrap of 2" angle iron and bolted it all up like this:

 

DSCN0206_001.JPG

 

Here you can see the articulation:

 

DSCN0207_001.JPG

 

Then I drilled and tapped two holes on the back of this piece of angle for adjustment screws. (Missed a closeup of this).

 

More to follow! This isn't all of this weekend's work!

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58) Mount it to a base plate

 

Ok...so this is out of order, but I mounted it to a piece of 12" x 18" x 1/2" plate. Man this thing is getting heavy! :)

 

59) Put it together and marvel at the glory!

 

Ok...so this is a little out of order picture wise as well. It was after I assembled everything that I made the changes to the idler tension setup, but here's more of an idea of where I am now.

 

DSCN0208_001.JPG

 

Here's the view I'll be seeing most of:

 

DSCN0209_001.JPG

 

And one more:

 

DSCN0210_001.JPG

 

Overall I'm pretty happy. The tracking works like a dream (with my 3/4" tapebelt anyways) and it looks kinda KMG-ish.

 

Now I'm getting ready to leave and go get my motor and drive package and another piece of steel for a tooling arm for the platen. More pics tonight when I've gotten than stuff back home.

 

-d

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Hi Deker,

 

I found your grinder build to be very informative. Just wondering if you are going to post some pictures of the final result (with motor attached). Also curious what attachments you have made for it.

 

Thanks,

 

Philip

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Hi Deker,

 

I found your grinder build to be very informative.  Just wondering if you are going to post some pictures of the final result (with motor attached).  Also curious what attachments you have made for it.

 

Thanks,

 

Philip

43768[/snapback]

 

I certainly will! I've been figuring out the mounting and VFD setup. I finally got it going though! After that I got a little distracted on a couple of knives :rolleyes: I'll probably get some good pictures this Sunday when I take it down to my blacksmith guild meeting.

 

-d

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Man that looks nice. I have some test subjects for it ;) I reforged thos kitchen knives and that looks like it would be perfect for setting the single bevel I plan on giving them. Woo hoo!!! :D

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Sounds great, can't wait to see your final setup. I ran a small bandsaw motor on my KMG for about a year before I saved up for a 2HP KB VFD. It was a little confussing wiring the 8 wires(if memory serves) up to the motor. Pretty neat the way you can adjust the torque curve and even set the amount and rate of braking when you cut the power and other features I didn't even bother fooling with. If you have the option, definitely go with a revering switch. It's a handy feature when your putting the final edge on a blade with a rotary plateen. If you have a washdown enclosure on your VFD, make sure you have adequetly sealed where the wires enter the enclosure, I used silicon for mine, no dust what so ever inside the VFD. I would definitely be a little upset if I fried my expensive VFD because I didn't protect it from dust.

 

Best of luck.

 

Philip

grinderesize.jpg

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Man that looks nice.  I have some test subjects for it ;)  I reforged thos kitchen knives and that looks like it would be perfect for setting the single bevel I plan on giving them.  Woo hoo!!! :D

43810[/snapback]

 

For those that don't know, BobO is in my guild...Looks like he'll be making the drive for the next meeting :D I also plan on making the work rest at the meeting. I will be diverging a LITTLE bit from the original plan and using a welder for this last bit. I COULD probably do it by drilling and tapping, but it would mean more $$ on taps and wouldn't leave a perfectly flat work surface. Consequently, if we get the table height right, I could probably get a really nice hollow grind with some of the new hollow grinding jigs that my friend Walt has made...

 

-d

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Sounds great, can't wait to see your final setup.  I ran a small bandsaw motor on my KMG for about a year before I saved up for a 2HP KB VFD.  It was a little confussing wiring the 8 wires(if memory serves) up to the motor.  Pretty neat the way you can adjust the torque curve and even set the amount and rate of braking when you cut the power and other features I didn't even bother fooling with.  If you have the option, definitely go with a revering switch.  It's a handy feature when your putting the final edge on a blade with a rotary plateen.  If you have a washdown enclosure on your VFD, make sure you have adequetly sealed where the wires enter the enclosure, I used silicon for mine, no dust what so ever inside the VFD.  I would definitely be a little upset if I fried my expensive VFD because I didn't protect it from dust.

 

Best of luck.

 

Philip,

 

My VFD is only a NEMA 1 enclosed device, so I've mounted it in a PVC junction box (that is VERY oversized to make sure I don't have heat issues). I will caulk up the cable entrance/exit points though, thanks for the suggestion. I had a little more wiring than just the motor though. I had a friend who used to be an electrician handle the motor wiring for me (just in case) and we figured out the VFD control wiring a bit as well. I had to wire up a speed pot, forward/reverse switch and the start/stop buttons. I still need to install a small, clear window so I can see the VFD display to know how fast I'm going, but at least it's running!

 

-d

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