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Dennis K

Steel Rolling Mill

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Hi everyone,

 

I wood like to share a different perspective on a Mc Donald rolling mill. The two rollers on the mill are 2- 7/16" diameter. I have eliminated all pulleys and belts and substituted a 60 to one gear reduction box with a 3-hp, 1140-rpm motor and a 21-tooth sprocket on the gearbox. The main roller sproket has 24 teeth, which works out to 22rpm. I have substituted pillow bearing and eliminated a lot of machine work. .If I aver make a another rolling mill, I word eliminate the 5 foot vertical pipe and lower cam assembly. This mill makes perfect knife blanks with or without taper. I have about four hundred dollars invested in this machine. The static phase converter cost a hundred and fifty dollars. I scrounged every thing else from local logging mills for ten cents a pound.

 

Dennis K

 

 

rolling_mill.jpgrolling_mill2.jpgrolling_mill3.jpg

Edited by Dennis K

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Looks good! There are definately different perspectives on this machine.

 

When I first builty mine, I used a gear reducer, but ended up using one that didn't have the required output torque. Needless to say it didn't have enough power. Yours doesn't look like it has that problem, though.

 

I had thought about using pillow blocks for the bottom rotation. How well does that work?

 

Personally, I like having the hand lever on the side. Quick and immediate adjustment. I also use it to taper my tangs when I'm forging.

 

I had never thought about widening the pedal. Does that help?

 

Did you make it the same height as described in the plans?

 

Jamie

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:35:

I would love to see the mill in action- how much reduction in 1 pass?

Ron

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Thank-you for your comments and I will try to answer your questions.

 

First, Jamie, using two pillow bearings for the camshaft carrier eliminates a lot of machine work and accomplishes the same thing. I welded the camshaft together and it works great. Widening the pedal does help. It is 2" wider and 2" longer than a size 12 work boot and the diamond plate makes it non slip.

The height of the stock feed is 35" to the bottom of the drive roller.

 

Ron, the mill will reduce an 8" long piece of metal @ 1400 degrees 3/16" thinner in one heat or roughly three passes through the rollers before it cools down.

 

Dennis K

Edited by Dennis K

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In reply to Brandon question, Why eliminate the lower cam assembly? First, it's redundant and it eats up 1/4 of the labor to fabricate this machine. I find it easier to control the taper in a blade with the foot pedal and yet have two hands free to control the steel. It's easier for me to take a big bite and control everything with foot pressure. This is just my humble opinion.

 

Dennis K

Edited by Dennis K

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In reply to Brandon’s question, Why eliminate the lower cam assembly?  First,  it’s redundant and it eats up 1/4 of the labor to fabricate this machine.  I find it easier to control the taper in a blade with the foot pedal and yet have two hands free to control the steel.  It’s easier for me to take a big bite and control everything with foot pressure. This is just my humble opinion.   

 

Dennis K

42244[/snapback]

any chance of getting a pic of the foot control up cloese ? :)

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I guess my perspective is a bit different. I'm a machinist, so the machine parts aren't really a hassle for me. I really like the idea of using pillow blocks instead of the bottom cam supports. One of these days I was going to rebuild mine, but make it taller. That was one of the changes I was going to use. Now that I know it will work, I'll do it!

 

Jamie

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Here's a picture of the lower cam assembly, hope it helps.

 

Dennis K.

 

 

mill.jpg

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Dennis,

 

Nice job on the building of the rolling mill. How is the bottom roller of the squezing section supported?

 

Thanks

Jan

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That is just so cool!! I'm about to complete one of those myself, it's been one of those on-again-off-again projects I've had going for years. Sadly it's going to look a lot mora bulky than yours.

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Dennis

First off really nice looking rolling mill, is the plans for that on the net somewhere or did you just build off of photos.

I am really interested in building one of those, could you post a photo of how the foot pedal cams up the lower roller.

Thanks

Chris

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There was a company a few years ago (big blu?) that was making these machines comercially. they, by memory where using a bottle jack instead of the strut and star nut arrangement for adjusting the bottom roller. this might be something else worth considering? :)

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I googled it and saw that Blacksmith depot used to offer these for sale but have stopped, and also found where they the plans are for sale for $25 from Norm Larson books.

I am probably going to get the plans and have a go at it.

Chris

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Hi Dennis,

 

How well are the pillow bearing coping with the loads imposed upon them?

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"they, by memory where using a bottle jack instead of the strut and star nut arrangement for adjusting the bottom roller. this might be something else worth considering? "

 

Good point. That approach was rejected by the originator, from what I recall,.though I'm not sure why. Maybe just because getting a cylinder up and down one handed while wielding hot metal with the other is a stretch. Some of the guys who have used the thing might offer guidance.

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Dennis,

 

How is the bottom roller of the squezing section supported?

 

Jan , the bottom roller assembly hinges on the I-beams and is supported by the foot pedal assembly.

 

Dennis

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There was a company a few years ago (big blu?) that was making these machines comercially. they, by memory where using a bottle jack instead of the strut and star nut arrangement for adjusting the bottom roller. this might be something else worth considering? :)

 

 

Boilermaker, The bottle jack was way too SLOW.

 

 

Dennis

Edited by Dennis K

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I googled it and saw that Blacksmith depot used to offer these for sale but have stopped, and also found where they the plans are for sale for $25 from Norm Larson books.

I am probably going to get the plans and have a go at it.

Chris

 

 

Chris, buying plans from Norm Larson for a McDonald rolling mill is a good idea and is the first step in understanding of how it works. After studying the plans I came to the conclusion the mill was over engineered, so I re-engineered it and built it with what I could find locally. I suggest you do the same thing .

 

Dennis

Edited by Dennis K

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"they, by memory where using a bottle jack instead of the strut and star nut arrangement for adjusting the bottom roller. this might be something else worth considering? "

 

Good point. That approach was rejected by the originator, from what I recall,.though I'm not sure why. Maybe just because getting a cylinder up and down one handed while wielding hot metal with the other is a stretch. Some of the guys who have used the thing might offer guidance.

 

 

Protactical,

 

Yes , all you need is the star nut for adjusting the bottom roller and you don't need the lower pillow bearings or the cam lob assembly or the five-foot pipe and wheel adjuster. The foot pedal assembly and a piece of 1-1/4 rod welded to the I-beams as a pivot point is all you need.

 

 

Dennis

Edited by Dennis K

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Hi Dennis,

 

How well are the pillow bearing coping with the loads imposed upon them?

 

 

 

Bob, the pillow bearings are old, heavy duty and made in the USA and can handle the load early.

 

 

Dennis

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Dennis

 

I am really interested in building one of those, could you post a photo of how the foot pedal cams up the lower roller.

Thanks

Chris

 

Chris, if I step on the foot pedal the bottom roller assembly goes up. See photo of pedal assemble.

 

 

foot_pedal_opti.jpg

 

 

foot_pedal2_opti.jpg

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Are the rolls made from mild steel?

 

 

Bob it is 1045 steel

 

 

Dennis

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Dennis, thanks for the replies. Is the 1045 hardened in any way? Would there be any advantage in using Hardened H13?

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