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Grainger Thermocouple


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That sounds handy as all get-out. Do you happen to have a part number or name for the model you use? I browsed Omega's site and promptly got lost.

Michael Burch

Part-Time Knifemaker

www.burchtreeblades.com

 

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That sounds handy as all get-out.  Do you happen to have a part number or name for the model you use?  I browsed Omega's site and promptly got lost.

43595[/snapback]

 

Michael, if you search the grainger catalog a little further you'll see Extech also has a dual input for around 120.00 I posted the link on BF a few days ago in a heat treat thread. As I offered to a fellow BF member, if you dont have an acct. w/ Grainger I can help you out. Shawn.

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Michael, if you search the grainger catalog a little further you'll see Extech also has a dual input for around 120.00 I posted the link on BF a few days ago in a heat treat thread. As I offered to a fellow BF member, if you dont have an acct. w/ Grainger I can help you out. Shawn.

43605[/snapback]

 

Wow, that would be much appreciated! Email sent your way -- :notworthy:

Edited by Burchtree

Michael Burch

Part-Time Knifemaker

www.burchtreeblades.com

 

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don't forget to protect your thermocouple element from the forge atmosphere - they get inaccurate pretty quick in a reducing environment.

43640[/snapback]

 

 

Okay, now I'm really confused -- are you talking about the actual thermocouple and and not the probe?

Michael Burch

Part-Time Knifemaker

www.burchtreeblades.com

 

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I may be confused, :wacko: but I think the thing you stick into the fire is the thermocouple, the thing that translates that into a temp readout is the pyrometer - in any case, I'm referring to the thing you stick into the fire - I've killed more than one of those in propane forges, and since I started using the ceramic sleeves they make to protect them I only killed one when the sleeve broke and I didn't notice. If you have an electric kiln, disregard all that, 'cause they work fine w/o protection in kilns.

Jomsvikingar Raða Ja!

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Here is a guide to thermo couples.(probes)

sensors

Like Jesse I like Omega products and here is the part number for the probe I ordered.

KQIN-14U-18 Omega

Omega has a nice probe selecting chart. This particular probe is 1/4" diameter,ungrounded, inconel alloy sheath 18" long and of course has a "K" reading range of up to 2500 degrees.

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I've been using an 'omega-clad' probe from omega. I use it almost continuously in my HT forge with absolutely no problems. Thicker is better.... I have a 1/4" one. If you go through their site, it will guide you to the one that best suits your purposes.

 

EDIT:

 

Well, no problems that have to do with the forge atmosphere.... I have ruined one or two due to my own boneheadedness :rolleyes:

Edited by Jesse Frank

Rósta að, maðr!

 

http://jfmetalsmith.com/

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That is a pretty handy probe config page. I went through it and ended up with a handle probe, K config, Inconal, 18 inches, 1/4 diameter, and ungrounded for $44. Does that sound about right? Sorry for all the questions, but I want to make sure I get something that will allow me to check different areas of the forge, and work as an "atmospheric" temp reader. How do I check to ensure that the probe will plug right into my extech -- or are they universal?

 

Thanks again for all the help --

Michael Burch

Part-Time Knifemaker

www.burchtreeblades.com

 

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Ther are different kinds of connectors.... standard, mini and sub mini. Some are made so that you directly wire the wire directly, bypassing the need for a connector. My thermometer accepts sub miniature connectors, but they don.t make a probe that works for me to fit that, so I ended up getting a probe with a standard plug, and I just ordered an adapter for it.

 

Just find out what type of connection your thermometer has , then get an adapter for it, if necessary.

Rósta að, maðr!

 

http://jfmetalsmith.com/

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  • 1 month later...

FWIW I picked up a fluke pyrometer on craigslist for $20. A local coffee cart had 2 of them to measure the temp of the steamed milk... talk about overkill :lol: I got another at the local scrapyard for $4. eBay has K-type thermocouples every so often (labs can only use them for a limited number of runs I guess) I picked up a set of 4 with ceramic sleeves for $30.

 

Good luck!!

Kristopher Skelton, M.A.

"There was never a good knife made from bad steel"

A quiet person will perish ~ Basotho Proverb

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Harbor Freigth has a cheap pyro that only goes to 1999 F or celsius. The K probe that comes with it is crap for high temp but a good thermocouple is easy to find.

They have it at $27 or $37 depending if you get a discount or not.

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Personally, I like grounded thermocouples. The primary reason is accuratcy and quickness of response. The ungrounded probes work, but do not respond as quickly, and they tend to read a few degrees lower in temperature. The reson for that is that the ungrounded probes have the thermocouple inside, but are insulated from the outside of the shield. So you get a lag in response, and because of the insulation, a lower temperature. But either will work. I have found that the grounded thermocouples are also less sensitive to electrical noise.

 

THe thicker the thermocouple, the longer it will last. It will also lag more because of larger thermal inertia. You just have to have it in the heat longer. K couples are good in the normal heat treating range of 1200-1750F. You need to get a R or S couple if you want accuracy and life at your forging temperatures of 2200F. K will work, but use a THICK one. Also at the higher temperatures, K couples will drift more over time.

 

Scott

D. Scott MacKenzie, PhD

Heat Treating (Aluminum and Steel)

Quenching (Water, Polymer, Oil, Salt and Mar-Tempering)

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