Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Alan Longmire

BIG long-bearded axe

Recommended Posts

Here's what I did on my forum vacation:

 

 

and here's how I did it in six easy steps for those of you who want to try it at home. ;)

Step 1: get steel. In this case, a six-inch bar of 7/8" square mild steel and some 1.5" x 1/4" 5160.

 

 

 

Step 2: apply heat. In this case, a coal forge does the job nicely!

 

 

 

Step 3: slit and drift the handle hole if you're doing a slit-and-drift eye.

 

 

 

Step 4: Weld body to blade, shape, and bevel edges.

 

 

 

Step 5: shape handle to fit.

 

 

 

Step 6: Make sure it all fits. Finish handle, and you're ready to lay waste with the Viking hordes! ;)

 

 

 

And that's how easy it is! :blink:

 

36" handle, 8" edge, estimated weight about three pounds. This is for the guy who got my previous one for his 15 year old son. The 13 year old wanted one too, but he wanted it BIGGER. So this one is his. It's a two-hand only version, whereas the first was a hand-and-a-half or bastard axe.

 

Edited to add a pic of the head with a REAL penny for scale. I don't have one of Raymond's giant pennies... :P

 

Edited by Alan Longmire

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks! I have about forty more... :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the pictorial. Axes must have been in the air during the break. Good job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks! I have about forty more... :rolleyes:

 

Wow, 40 more pennies... lucky you ;) Nice tutorial of sorts. I'll have to be trying it when I have time. Working sucks... <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mmm, big axe. Nice.

 

I've managed to get a hole slit and halfway drifted for a small axe. We'll see if I manage to mess it up, but it looks nice and even so far. You're inspiring me to consider splitting the end and welding in a bit.

 

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Noticed how your fingers are trying to stay cool while your drifting the eye. Think they do that on there own.

 

Yeah, I didn't know they were trying to escape the heat until I saw the picture, but can you blame them? :lol: And you're not fooling anyone. That penny in the mini-hawk picture is 3" across... ;)

 

My main slitting tool is Grond the treadle hammer, a 1600-pound monstrosity made of solid steel from mining equipment by Dave Oliver. My actual slitting chisel is made from a ball-pein hammerhead, visible on the anvil. I did some self-timer pics of that process, but the treadle hammer shook the garage so bad the pics are all blurry! :rolleyes:

 

 

Bob, It really wasn't a tutorial, but I guess I can add a pic or two sometime.

 

Mstu, you wanna see the easy way to split the end for the edge steel?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I then clean it up with a 3" brick set chisel I've sharpened to make a nice v-bottom split, then forge the edge steel into a thin wedge to fit in the split.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan, sorry for the mistermification. Nice er... secquence of photos ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

alan,

 

thanks for the pictures...

I always love to watch how others do work... inspiring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very cool and great pics also. Thanks for the show.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice pictures it's a great looking axe too.

Thanks Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gee Alan,

 

Really nice pictorial essay on the axe. However, Grond is really

impressive, so delicate and refined.

 

He,He!!

 

Bill

Edited by Bill Hoffman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Alan,

 

I've been thinking lately how handy a metal cutting bandsaw would be. After I finish saving up for the copper cable to run some welder-capable power to my little shop, a saw may be the next big item. With a welder and a saw, I'll be ready to start working on a Grond of my own. Of course, the cable and a saw might cost me a 'grond' so it may be a while yet :D

 

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got the bandsaw from an old landlord for $50, so keep looking around! I wouldn't pay more than $150 for one of this fine Chinese quality, anyway.

 

Grond is a refined and delicate beast, he only makes the china (about 75 feet away) rattle a little bit with each blow! ;) He also doesn't always hit straight, but the price was right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Jake! Next time you're able to make it down here, to one of Harley's hammerins or whenever, you must have the VIP tour. (that means you get the good scotch ;) ) Say, if I were to send you a package, does J. Powning, Markhamville, New Brunswick work?

 

I'm diggin that anvil too. It's new to me, and darned near new. It's a 100-Kg (220lb) Refflinghaus made in 2000. Got it in trade for some sharpened ironmongery from a guy who bought it new then decided he wasn't a smith. Flawless except for a tiny ding in the face, the edges hadn't even been radiused! ^_^ Well, it did have a big streak of mouse-pee rust down the center of the face, but that came off with a wire wheel. :wacko:

 

Sorry to brag, but hey, it's nice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...