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julian

Knife Pommel/Guard casting

4 posts in this topic

Hi all, I'm new to this website, and also relatively new to bladesmithing. I've been wondering if anyone has tips on casting pommels and guards- I've always just forged the guards, and haven't had much to do with pommels. Thanks guys

Edited by julian

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You can cast guards and other things with a variety of materials.There are many online recouces that cover the basics.Do a search on (lost wax casting) it is a fun way to cast.There are also many books,videos,dvd's on the subject as well as classes at places like rec centers and junior colleges.

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Last summer I got a large box of graphite drop pieces and have been using them for casting molds. Graphite machines and carves real easy and holds up to many heatings. I have not done any guard or pommel casting yet.

 

Here are a couple casting projects I did a few weeks ago.

 

Lanyard ring and fastener

 

Copper machinist hammer

 

Bronze machinist hammer

 

Most of us allready have a forge and with a $16 graphite crucible and some mould material you can start casting. It is pretty cool playing with yellow hot molten metal. Kinda addicting to!!

Edited by B Finnigan

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I just finished a quick experiment using stainless steel to make a re-usable precision mold for pommel and guard casting.

If you machine a shape (ie a rough pommel or guard) into a block of stainless and machine a matching lid that bolts down onto it then pour the metal into it from the side it seems to make a damn good cast, plus the finished product just falls right out once you unbolt it without having to destroy the mold. tried it with alluminium have to see if it works with other alloys.

i'll post pictures as soon as i can. hope this helps.

one newbie to another. :lol:

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