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HT of Chuck Robinson Post Anvil


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Several years ago I purchased a "chunk-o" steel from Chuck Robinson that is about 5" x 5" x 18" which he used for his knifemakers post anvil. I'd like to heat treat one end surface to build up my own post anvil ... but have no idea how. I kinda wish I had just bought the whole anvil now, but then I'd have had to move it three times by now (along with 15 tons of other "stuff").

 

Any ideas on how to proceed with the HT on this beast?

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If I remember correctly they were 4130/40/50 ?

You might be able to get away with torch-hardening the face, I've done it with 4X4 pieces of 4150 and it's worked just fine, torch the face to an orange and let it cool, the mass of the block will draw it some.

 

Other than that, you'll have to whip-up a big firebrick/isnwool furnace and get it into a drum of oil or water.

Randal

www.rhgraham.simpl.com

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I'd recomend his video to anyone just on the basis of the amazing work he does and to drool over his shop. I'm also glad I bought his "whole" anvil instead of just the unheattreated blocks, though tackling one of those blocks would be fun!

Guy Thomas

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I gotta agree with Jesse on this one... tackling any large mass of steel would cause injury ;)

Bob O

 

"When I raise my flashing sword, and my hand takes hold on judgment, I will take vengeance upon mine enemies, and I will repay those who haze me. Oh, Lord, raise me to Thy right hand and count me among Thy saints."

 

My Website

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Got a reply from Chuck. It was good to hear from him again.

 

"Hey Dan,

Good to hear from you.

The way I heat treat would be a little difficult for you in your situation, and since I also use 55 gallons of super quench, a little expensive. Grind down the anvil face as square as possible with a side grinder and radius the edges slightly. Then stand the billet face up in a metal drum say like 1/2 a 55 gal drum, and use a large rosebud to rapidly heat the face to above 1550 F. Do it relatively fast, about 10_15 minutes till the color is about 2" thick then rapidly pour into the drum a saturated brine solution that you pre mix in the other half of the drum. Rapidly stir the brine to minimize the steam pockets for 5 minutes. If the billet screams and vibrates for about 10 seconds in the brine it has hardened. Let it cool for about 15 minutes in the brine. Rinse with fresh water paint and you should have a useable anvil.

You shouldn't need the vide unless you want to build the adjustable base.

Regards,

Chuck"

 

Guess I'll take a shot at it when I have a day to kill. I'll take pics of what I come up with.

Dan

 

Got a reply from Chuck. It was good to hear from him again.

 

"Hey Dan,

Good to hear from you.

The way I heat treat would be a little difficult for you in your situation, and since I also use 55 gallons of super quench, a little expensive. Grind down the anvil face as square as possible with a side grinder and radius the edges slightly. Then stand the billet face up in a metal drum say like 1/2 a 55 gal drum, and use a large rosebud to rapidly heat the face to above 1550 F. Do it relatively fast, about 10_15 minutes till the color is about 2" thick then rapidly pour into the drum a saturated brine solution that you pre mix in the other half of the drum. Rapidly stir the brine to minimize the steam pockets for 5 minutes. If the billet screams and vibrates for about 10 seconds in the brine it has hardened. Let it cool for about 15 minutes in the brine. Rinse with fresh water paint and you should have a useable anvil.

You shouldn't need the vide unless you want to build the adjustable base.

Regards,

Chuck"

 

Guess I'll take a shot at it when I have a day to kill. I'll take pics of what I come up with.

Dan

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Great advice from Chuck!

 

I have a couple big post anvils here made of 1045, and this sounds like a great idea. Though I suppose it is necessary that the anvil be a few inches shorter than the 1/2 barrel, no?

 

I also wonder if it would help to wire/hose clamp a cone of Kaowool to the anvil, say 4" down from the face? Would this both heat the face faster and keep heat from travelling down into the rest of the anvil?

 

John

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  • 2 weeks later...

Glad to hear all is well in Anvil land, I started to worry when I didn't hear back after Katrina.

 

The video is awesome, If I could find the appropriate steel, I would give it a try just to freak out the neighbours, one needs a few projects like that just in case they get uppity.

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