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Not 100% done with it. I'd picked up a few large lumbermill saw blades while down in Eugene last month. I had given up any thoughts of finding anymore shear steel. This isn't but its sure got alot of activity going on. I'll get some better pictures after I do more etching. This is a good sized knife. 10" blade and 16" overall.

PDRM1794.JPG

PDRM1796.JPG

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Raymond,

 

Is there something you look for when buying large saw blades to better your chances of getting shear steel? Do you have any pictures of the teeth on the ones you have found? How thick are they, and what was the diameter of the blade?

 

There's a junktique place down the street from me. One of the real packrat types who gets shut down all the time because his spread encroaches the highway and other peoples property. Anyways, he has dozens of those big old sawmill blades for sale and actually gives me a pretty good price on stuff.

 

I also have a question about the shear pattern. Would it come through just by taking a sample of the steel and etching it, or do you have to heat treat it to get the pattern to show? I'm sure he would let me run out there with my 18" belt sander and make a clean spot on each blade. Would be cool if I could hit it with ferric before I bought it and know what I am getting.

 

Thanks,

 

--adam

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Adam, I wish I could tell you away to find out before you buy. I don't think trying a test out in the field would do you any good. Normally I don't start seeing any pattern till I'm down to at least 400 grit and thats after several etches. When I got these last saw blades it was because I got a good deal on them. The two larger blades were 38". One's just under 1/4" and the other is just over 3/16". I'd just go ahead and take a gamble and get one. You can't go wrong with the steel and who knows you may hit the jackpot.

 

My suggestion is to get the one with the thickest steel. I think alot of the pattern that I'm getting is from the way the steel was rolled out and by nickle.

Edited by Raymond Richard
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Something about that knife speaks to me, I really like the shape =]

I like how it all comes together.

 

So, if no one minds kinda explaining, what exactly is shear steel?

 

So wrought iron was heated in a cementation furce (like a kiln) for two weeks with charcoal which made blister steel...which has high carbon outside, low center, blister appearance on surface...blister is then folded and welded to make shear? Says slag trapped in the steel can lead to a serrated blade edge without it actually being serrated?

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Something about that knife speaks to me, I really like the shape =]

I like how it all comes together.

 

So, if no one minds kinda explaining, what exactly is shear steel?

 

So wrought iron was heated in a cementation furce (like a kiln) for two weeks with charcoal which made blister steel...which has high carbon outside, low center, blister appearance on surface...blister is then folded and welded to make shear? Says slag trapped in the steel can lead to a serrated blade edge without it actually being serrated?

 

Here's a link to shear steel: http://www.tilthammer.com/timeworks/steel.html The saw steel that I used on this knife I don't belive it to be shear steel mainly because its not a very old blade. I'd say its less than 50 years old but I could be wrong. I got these last saw blades from Wayne Goddard. His thoughts are that the pattern I'm getting in the steel is from the way the steel was rolled out which is real simular to rolling out a pie crust by rolling in all directions. Also because of the amount of nickle in the steel. Here's a picture of a blade I did a few years back from what we both believe to be shear steel. I came about this old saw blade when I worked construction and it was in a load of sand file. Must have been in the Williamette River for many years. There's a good deal of difference between the two steels. The steel in the blade in the attachment looks like it could be an industrialized damascus.

PDRM0671.JPG

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They both have pretty cool patterning.

I like the one on the second lots as well.

It's a shame that a lot of the old processes aren't used to make the old materials anymore. I can understand that there are better ways, but seems like some of the older materials have properties that some would like.

 

I guess in those instances it'd be up to us who want them to make them ourselves.

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Very cool blades Ray.

 

I have always had a fondnest for saw blade steel, the knives I made from it kept beans on our table for a number of years :D

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Very cool blades Ray.

 

I have always had a fondnest for saw blade steel, the knives I made from it kept beans on our table for a number of years :D

 

 

Don, Got to love those beans! Someday I'm going to tune my burner to run on processed bean gas. I could work all day and everyone would be happy.

 

Saw steel is still my favorite. Got two more going right now I'll be taking to Blade. Look forward to seeing you if your aren't swarmed with to many people.

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I used to price my knives based on the price of a case of caned beans :D

 

I look forward to seeing you there Raymond, I hope to be freed up after the big rush but you will be covered up if you bring knives like you've been posting lately.

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I put a new battery in the camera and hopefully that will take care of my crappy photos. Once it gets charged up I'll see what kind of magic if any I can do with it. Won't be doing much in the shop. Ended up stabbing myself in the right hand yesterday so I'm out of commission for a few days as far as knife work goes. If something is going to happen to me its always just before a show. Maybe I need to stop doing them and my luck will change.

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