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Bloodwood and brass ballock dagger.


John Gage
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Hey everyone,

 

I just finished this dagger up. It is the first of this type that will be a permanent offering from me.

It is 15" long with a 10" blade. The blade is hollow ground from 3/8" 1075.

The hilt is bloodwood and brass.

 

Thanks for lookng.

 

John

ballock1.11.jpg

ballock2.1.jpg

ballock3.1.jpg

Edited by John Gage
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Don't you just LOVE bloodwood?

Great dong dagger.

"I'm not anti-gun. I'm pro-knife." Molly Ivins

NT Limpin' Cat Prokopp

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I like bloodwood, I've used it on a few projects so far.

*thinks* Handle scabbard of my second knife.

Trim/Panels on two jewelry boxes, and the Primary body wood on another.

And Parts of a segmented vase as well.

 

It's a nice wood. I wanna make a pen from it too =P

I'll definitely use it more.

 

Anyone tried using Brazilian Cherry on any handles? I used it on a jewelry box combined with the bloodwood, both are hard and heavy =P Especially the cherry.

 

Question! Is it sharpened on both edges? The second image, the side seems to be pretty thick almost like a spine, would both sides be this way, with the primary function being stabbing?

 

Here's a related question. How do you guys differentiate between a knife and a dagger?

My thoughts are that knives tend to have a single sharpened bevel, as they are meant more for cutting. Daggers have a double bevel...but are they sharp? As the blade tends to be more meant for thrusting/stabbing? Was curious as my sister is a writer and a while back when I had come to think this, I had suggested she change a dagger in her story to a knife as the character was cutting her hair. I'd imagine daggers are normally sharpened as well for more versatility. Suppose a sharpened dagger would kinda have the best o both worlds, nice for stabbing, but have the slicing ability as well.

 

Anyway just curious about you guys thoughts on it as well thought it was kinda on topic as well, since the blade was a dagger. Is it just the double bevels that makes it a dagger or more?

Edited by EdgarFigaro

Beau Erwin

www.ErwinKnives.com

Custom knives

Bcarta Composites

Stabilized Woods

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technically i think this is a ballock knife, for the reasons stated - and in this form the ballock knife could be considered the fore-runner of the highland dirk; single edged, with a very thick spine, and the lobes - balls - which in the dirk were transmuted into haunches. there were also ballock daggers, with much slimmer double edged blades. this hilt form was fairly ubiquitous throughout europe from c.1300 th c.1700 - the handle was thematically and practically too good an idea to let go of. whether the blade was of knife or dagger form depended on how it was to be used, with a broadly north south divide between the two. however, in most texts i've read, the terms ballock knife and ballock dagger have been used interchangably, as most historians know jack about practicalities ( i write as an ex-historian, before anyone takes offence!).

just my tuppence, but i've read alot on this subject in researching dirks.

cheers,

Jake

Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

www.knifemaker.co.uk

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

Albert Einstein

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technically i think this is a ballock knife, for the reasons stated - and in this form the ballock knife could be considered the fore-runner of the highland dirk; single edged, with a very thick spine, and the lobes - balls - which in the dirk were transmuted into haunches. there were also ballock daggers, with much slimmer double edged blades. this hilt form was fairly ubiquitous throughout europe from c.1300 th c.1700 - the handle was thematically and practically too good an idea to let go of. whether the blade was of knife or dagger form depended on how it was to be used, with a broadly north south divide between the two. however, in most texts i've read, the terms ballock knife and ballock dagger have been used interchangably, as most historians know jack about practicalities ( i write as an ex-historian, before anyone takes offence!).

just my tuppence, but i've read alot on this subject in researching dirks.

cheers,

Jake

 

Hi Jake,

 

 

Thank you , that is some excellent information.

 

Regards,

 

John

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Thats a nice blade. I like the shapre a lot.

Bob O

 

"When I raise my flashing sword, and my hand takes hold on judgment, I will take vengeance upon mine enemies, and I will repay those who haze me. Oh, Lord, raise me to Thy right hand and count me among Thy saints."

 

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That is one clean and straightforward knife. I like it!

“All work is empty save when there is love, for work is love made visible.” Kahlil Gibran

"It is easier to fight for one's principles than to live up to them." - Alfred Adler

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Thanks guys, I do appreciate it :). The really cool part about these is there are endless amounts of variations of this type of "dagger". Its like the bowie just completely different. :) So i shouldn't get too bored making alot of them.

 

Take care,

 

John

Edited by John Gage
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Good to see you, Gage! Nice looking dagger you have there.

Ancora Imparo

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