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beuford23

annealing 5160

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Would I get the same results in annealing 5160 by leaving it overnight in coals or burying it vermiculite. I figure that the coals will keep the temp dropping slow enough.

 

Anyone ever tried this, and apologies for kicking the proverbial deadhorse

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In the winter I anneal alot of blade steel in the wood stove. It takes at least two days to get a good anneal but what the heck, the stove is going anyway. You also do not get much heat scale either by doing it in regular wood coals. The steel will get close to CT but does it very slowly and stays at CT for a longer time.

Edited by B Finnigan

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In the winter I anneal alot of blade steel in the wood stove

 

I tryed once last winter. The result is a beautyful bowie blade with no carbon.

I thougt that the atmosphere in my stove was reducing while it is strongly oxidant.

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My woodstove is very air tight and I always kept the steel chunks buried deep in the ash. I have not had any carbon loss but I am sure if I left them in for a week or more that some would oxidize. Most of the chunks were 1" 1080 round bar pieces that I use for hawks. Maybe the thickness protected the carbon.

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The stuff has been cutting like butter, will just wait and see how it hardens for me. What are the chances of carbon loss in a situation like the one I used (leaving steel in the hot coals overnight)?

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Most of what happens during annealing takes place between about 1550F and about 1100F. Carbides are getting bigger and that involves the diffusion of carbon. The diffusion of carbon in steel slows dramatically below the A1 which is about 1330F. If you can slow cool until it loses its color, you have done most of what can be done. Keeping it for an extra two days to get to room temperature is not usually worth the trouble. There are some exceptions which my critics will now raise in vast profusion.... :blink:

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