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Taking pics of knives..


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I was using a digital camera to try to take some pics of knives.

They ended up..er..bad..real bad.. :unsure:

Either too dark..too light..no detail etc..

The best one I took looked 'wavy..the knife looked crooked. (Not that I don't miss a hammer blow sometimes.... :lol: )

And no..I'm not going to post it..it's embarassing.. :P

Ok..photograpy is not my forte'.

Any suggestions, help, prayers, incantations or moral support appreciated.

 

Josh

Edited by A Flor
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Jim Cooper has what you need!

 

http://www.knifenetwork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=26222

 

I hate to direct folks to another forum but Jim is a good Dude and posted all this information here at Don's forum some time ago...I don't think it made it through the last hacking. <_<

 

Anyway, 90% of knife photgraphy problems come back to bad lighting. The truth is that a modern knife maker is going to have to do serious self promotion and learning to take decent pictures and process and share them by resizing and "clean up" is simply a critical skill now days.

 

If some of us guys can take a decent pix I know you can do it as well, Josh. The link above will get you started.

 

Brian

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Right you are, Brian. I invested in a very good digital camera 2 years ago, and I'm still messing around with learning lighting. Somewhere along the line, I need to get a much better image processing program: Photoshop more than likely. That means selling a few knives to earn grupnicki and zloti.

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Jim Cooper has what you need!

 

http://www.knifenetwork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=26222

 

I hate to direct folks to another forum but Jim is a good Dude and posted all this information here at Don's forum some time ago...I don't think it made it through the last hacking. <_<

 

Anyway, 90% of knife photgraphy problems come back to bad lighting. The truth is that a modern knife maker is going to have to do serious self promotion and learning to take decent pictures and process and share them by resizing and "clean up" is simply a critical skill now days.

 

If some of us guys can take a decent pix I know you can do it as well, Josh. The link above will get you started.

 

Brian

 

Hi Brian..Charles..

Thanks for the link.

So THATS how they do it.. :P

I appreciate the info.

Always learning something..

 

Again thanks..

Josh

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Jim Cooper has what you need!

 

http://www.knifenetwork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=26222

 

I hate to direct folks to another forum but Jim is a good Dude and posted all this information here at Don's forum some time ago...I don't think it made it through the last hacking. <_<

 

Anyway, 90% of knife photgraphy problems come back to bad lighting. The truth is that a modern knife maker is going to have to do serious self promotion and learning to take decent pictures and process and share them by resizing and "clean up" is simply a critical skill now days.

 

If some of us guys can take a decent pix I know you can do it as well, Josh. The link above will get you started.

 

Brian

 

Hi Brian..

I built the 'box studio'..

Definately a vast improvement.

However, I think my old digital is now the problem.

The lighting seems ok..

But the resolution is 'choppy' at close ups.

The straight edges look 'broken'.

Even with photo edit software, no go..

No way to adjust it..old camera.

Are there any recommendations for good camera without breaking the bank?

And suggestions appreciated..

Josh

Edited by A Flor
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Some things on your camera to check is to make sure in it's settings that the picture quality and resolution are both set to the max. That can affect picture quality.

 

Then another is on some cameras (I've noticed this on my mom's) the zoom doesn't work all that well, I think because only a portion of it isthe lens and then another portion is digital zoom (zooming more than lens allows) the digital zoom part has poor resolution from what I've seen. So I'd say zoom out all the way, and just get the actual camera close.

 

This is just what I'd try.

Do you know what the Megapixel rating on your cam is?

 

There are probably others more qualified to give you advice, but that's just stuff I'd look at myself.

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Some things on your camera to check is to make sure in it's settings that the picture quality and resolution are both set to the max. That can affect picture quality.

 

Then another is on some cameras (I've noticed this on my mom's) the zoom doesn't work all that well, I think because only a portion of it isthe lens and then another portion is digital zoom (zooming more than lens allows) the digital zoom part has poor resolution from what I've seen. So I'd say zoom out all the way, and just get the actual camera close.

 

This is just what I'd try.

Do you know what the Megapixel rating on your cam is?

 

There are probably others more qualified to give you advice, but that's just stuff I'd look at myself.

 

Hi..

Yes..I tryed to zoom out thing.

Tryed to manually focus but will only go to a point.

The camera is fixed at 640X400.

No way to adjust the pixels.

It's an old camera.

The box studio does great..big improvement.

Just the pics show no detail..or are 'wavy' on the edges.

Josh

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This one is shot on an old Sony Mavica, 1.2 megapixel camera....the picture is resized to not much bigger than 640X480 or so. The camera is so old it still shoots onto 3 1/2" floppies!!

 

ThemeShot.jpg

 

I'm not sure more resolution is the ultimate answer to better pictures but you may be having a camera issue. I recently shot a bunch of pictures (not professional quality but good enough to document the sword) with my wife's 4.7 megapixel snapshot digital. It cost me $170 for the camera and that was 2 years ago.

 

KissakiHamon.jpg

 

Can you post a picture of the problem? Sometimes it helps to see the problem. I'm a hack photographer but I do know that you can get great pictures with very little in the way of sophistication camera wise. Of course, a great camera with the appropriate lenses is the ultimate solution but I'd be willing to bet all that you need is a little experimentation and a tutorial with Photoshop and you'd be fine.

 

Does your camera have a macro setting?

 

Brian

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Josh,

I definitely agree on the lighting aspect of it. I try to take pictures outdoors when the sun is diffused by light clouds or low in the sky. Guys that do car photos wait for early evening light. Any time I rely on the flash they look washed out and out of focus. Cameras love lots of light! The greater the light, the smaller the aperture (lower f-stop) and more depth-of-field.

Also, play around with the camera to see where it auto-focuses.

 

Sometimes a bit further away and zoomed in will give you a greater depth-of-field. This helps with 3-D objects.

 

Don't worry about the photos you post to get help with your knives so much... it will hold you back. One thing at a time!

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Josh,

I definitely agree on the lighting aspect of it. I try to take pictures outdoors when the sun is diffused by light clouds or low in the sky. Guys that do car photos wait for early evening light. Any time I rely on the flash they look washed out and out of focus. Cameras love lots of light! The greater the light, the smaller the aperture (lower f-stop) and more depth-of-field.

Also, play around with the camera to see where it auto-focuses.

 

Sometimes a bit further away and zoomed in will give you a greater depth-of-field. This helps with 3-D objects.

 

Don't worry about the photos you post to get help with your knives so much... it will hold you back. One thing at a time!

 

Hi..

Thanks to all for the help..

I've been playing with the camera and cut down on the light..

 

Here is a pic..

Not the greatest, but better..

Any more suggestions appreciated..

Josh

tanto2.jpg

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Ouch... You need a new camera - unless you have it set on "low definition".

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The camera didn't focus on the blade, it's focused on the cloth the blade is sitting on. Check your menu, there may be a feature called "close object priority" make sure it's turned off.

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