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Beau Erwin

Welding glasses

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I've read a few times that it's a good idea to get some welding glasses for looking into your forge when you're forge welding. Some that block both Ultraviolent and Infrared.

 

Well since I've been getting into forge welding recently, I've been wanting to do this.

 

I had asked me neighbor about it as he's a steel welder.

He named off some places that would be good to check out, but then just took me in his shop and handed me some and said try these.

 

He said they're OSHA certified and the ones he was given/uses for welding.

He said you can do spot or spark (not sure which he said) welding while wearing them and they'll protect your eyes. He also said they're a number 10.

 

So would these be good protection for my eyes from the light given off by the forge (UV and IR) ?

They're a green tint, pretty hard to see when in a dark area, but seems like they'll work good for looking into the forge.

 

Anyway just wanted to double check on it.

 

He said if they weren't what I was looking for to let him know and he'd find them. The proceeded to give me a lecture on wearing safety glasses =] Pretty cool guy, and yes I like my eyes, so I do tend to wear some form of safety glasses. Was just wanting to find some to protect from the UV and IR.

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A shade 10 is considered the least darkness filter needed for arc welding.A shade 5 is considered ok for welding with a torch and should be dark enough for what you are looking for.Ive always liked the Diamond brand green cutting glasses.The local welding supplier should be very helpful.

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I have some flip-down shade 5's that work really well for extended gas forge work, but are a little dark otherwise. If I could find more, I'd get shade 3 instead. UV is pretty easy to stop, it's the IR that'll cause more problems from forge work as opposed to electric welding. Kinda cooks your eyes in their own juices, which can contribute to cataracts later in life.

 

 

Look like this: B) not this: :blink:

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What I was really kinda curious about is if you guys thought that these glasses would block both the UV and IR.

Not sure if all welding glasses are made to block both or just one or what.

 

Kinda wann protect my eyes, don't want cataracts. Kinda hoping I don't get trigillums from my dad...they're hereditary just hoping not me...=[

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If they're a real shade 10 then they're overkill for forge welding- consider what Glenn siad about arc (mig and tig welding, too) that shade 10 is appropriate. It's going to be hard to find eye protection that doesn't offer UVA and UVB protection and most saftey glasses will block 99.9% of these rays per OSHA regulations. Hell, my eye doc puts a UVA/UVB block on my prescription glasses as part of the purchase price.

 

Heed the wisdom of Alan: IR is not to be trifled with. Continue reading but I'm gonna stick with shade 10 is overkill for forgewelding, even if you're staring into the welding heat continually. I refer you to the OSHA website linked below and the "gas welding" section. I'd consider forge welding to be a "heavy welding" operation per their criteria, but again we're only looking at the heat for a few seconds, not minutes at a time- note that 6 is the highest minimum requirement.

 

However, from safetyglassesusa.com in their "Glass blowing" glasses section:

 

Lens Types

Boroscopes: Phillips Boroscopes offer extra UV and IR protection needed when working on borosilicate glass which is a hard glass type on which regular didymium or Phillips202/ACE are inadequate due to insufficient filtration of UV and IR absorption.

Rose Didymium Glass: A high luminous transimittance filter designed to absorb bright yellow sodium flare which occurs when heating glass.

Light Green Glass: Light Green glass in nature. Excellent UV and IR Protection. It is available in different shades, ranging from 1.7 to 3.0. Commonly used for observation of molten metals.

Phillips 202 Glass (ACE): An Advanced Version of the Rose Didymium Glass. Phillips 202: ACE is a new material that utilizes rare earth oxides in the glass composition to acheive unique color enhancing characteristics.

Phillips 202 Gold Coated: Gold-coated Phillips 202 provides extra UV and IR protection and is commonly used in scientific glassblowing.

 

Oh damn, who's a badass? Yep me. Check this out:

http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.sh...S&p_id=9778

 

1910.133(a)(5)

 

The employer shall ensure that each affected employee uses equipment with filter lenses that have a shade number appropriate for the work being performed for protection from injurious light radiation. The following is a listing of appropriate shade numbers for various operations.

 

this is a little tricky to read because of formatting but, the first set is electrode size in 32nds of an inch and the second number is arc current, last number is "minumum protective shade". enjoy

 

Filter Lenses for Protection Against Radiant Energy

____________________________________________________________________

 

Minimum(*)

Operations Electrode Size 1/32 in. Arc Current Protective

Shade

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Shielded metal

arc welding Less than 3 ......... Less than 60 ... 7

3-5 ................. 60-160 ......... 8

5-8 ................. 160-250 ........ 10

More than 8 ......... 250-550 ........ 11

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Gas metal arc

welding and

flux cored

arc welding less than 60 ... 7

60-160 ......... 10

160-250 ........ 10

250-500 ........ 10

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Gas Tungsten

arc welding less than 50 ... 8

50-150 ......... 8

150-500 ........ 10

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Air carbon (Light) ............. less than 500 .. 10

Arc cutting (Heavy) ............. 500-1000 ....... 11

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Plasma arc welding less than 20 ... 6

20-100 ......... 8

100-400 ........ 10

400-800 ........ 11

 

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Plasma arc (light)(**) ......... less than 300 .. 8

cutting (medium)(**) ........ 300-400 ........ 9

(heavy)(**) ......... 400-800 ........ 10

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Torch brazing ................ 3

Torch soldering ................ 2

Carbon arc welding ................ 14

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Filter Lenses for Protection Against Radiant Energy

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Minimum(*)

Operations Plate thickness-inches Plate thickness-mm Protective

Shade

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Gas Welding:

Light Under 1/8 ............ Under 3.2 ......... 4

Medium 1/8 to 1/2 ........... 3.2 to 12.7 ....... 5

Heavy Over 1/2 ............. Over 12.7 ......... 6

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Oxygen cutting:

Light Under 1 .............. Under 25 .......... 3

Medium 1 to 6 ............... 25 to 150 ......... 4

Heavy Over 6 ............... Over 150 .......... 5

______________________________________________________________________

Footnote(*) As a rule of thumb, start with a shade that is too dark

to see the weld zone. Then go to a lighter shade which gives

sufficient view of the weld zone without going below the minimum. In

oxyfuel gas welding or cutting where the torch produces a high yellow

light, it is desirable to use a filter lens that absorbs the yellow

or sodium line in the visible light of the (spectrum) operation.

Footnote(**) These values apply where the actual arc is clearly

seen. Experience has shown that lighter filters may be used when the

arc is hidden by the workpiece.

Edited by Kristopher Skelton

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Not real certain what a shade ten would look like when looking through it.

In doors where there is poor lighting it's hard to see. But I had put them on and went outside and could see pretty well. Kinda just seemed like dark sunglasses.

 

I kinda figured they'd all protect on UVA and UVB as you see that on just about everything anymore. But do they all protect on IR? It's the one I was kind of wondering about the most.

 

So it sounds like I might just try these I have and see how they are, or use them in the mean time and tell him that I read for gas welding that a 6 would be ideal and to make sure it filters IR as well.

 

When I was doing my cable welding the last time I did kind of keep an eye on it while keeping it turning and the like. Didn't wanna burn any of it so was keeping a close eye on it.

 

Now since I use a charcoal fueled forge, would it be any different than the info above for Gas Welding? Like would the coals in the bottom that are glowing brighter than just yellow do anything? Most of the time not looking at those though, just the chamber itself.

 

So would a 6 be good or should I go a little lower?

 

The ones Jens posted sounded pretty cool but pricey as I'm not sure if I'd be very good at keeping them very scratch free.

 

Hrm, a bit to think on anyway.

Just wanna be sure to protect my eyes good =P I like having them, they serve me well *laughs*

 

That light green glass sounds pretty good and they are 3 at the max...*thinks*

Edited by EdgarFigaro

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I'd go with the light green, if you have to stare into the fire. With coal, I just don't look very often! :) My regular glasses do filter all UV, and some IR. My safety glasses (my regular glasses are also ANSI Z-87 impact rated, but don't have side or brow shields) do the same, plus they have the flip-down shade 5 for those times when I just *have* to stare into a fire.

 

The best advice is wear safety glasses of any sort, and just don't spend a lot of time looking into the fire. I can't forge with my shade 5s on, they're too dark. I can't see the natural color of the metal with them on either, which can be a bad thing.

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I have a shade 3 face shield mounted such that I can see my forge through it. The shield is mounted to the bench that the forge sits on, not on my head. I wear a pair of clear safety glasses at all times which is fine for forging and having a bench mounted shield is a lot more convenient than constantly swapping between green and clear glasses.

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Hello All,

A shade three is fine for what we do....shade five is good, but the trip hazzard was not worth the hassel (can't see much with the five's on).

The AWS (America welding Society) at one time recommended a shade three for blacksmith work...or so said my techer who was a the forman of some 25 welders in indusutry and the local AWS instructor.

 

I have a shade three face shiled with clear cover. I swap out the cover as needed (flux does damade)

Most oftern I use glasses though.

 

Ric

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i like the face sheald in front of the forge ill have to use that probubly cheeper than didiyum lenses as well and much easyer to where

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I'm kinda now wondering if the glasses aren't 5s.

 

I got them out to use them today and was looking at them in the light, hadn't really inspected them.

 

Anyway both side lenses have Sh5.0 and I think I saw the z87 print as well.

Both front lenses have C5.0 in small lettering up near the top.

 

Bit hard to see in until the chamber in my charcoal forge is up to heat. So would these be 5s then? 3s might be a good idea if so. Was using them while welding up some today, and switched to my clear ones for the general forging.

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Sounds like it to me too. Would explain why it wasn't all that difficult to see in the light, just in a darkened area it's quite difficult. Plus hard to see in the forge till it gets nice and hot =]

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I've never used any glasses while forge welding,but this thread got me thinking....so I checked out the Rio Grande catolog and they have a green #3 with IR protection for $11.50 a pair.. seems like a bargin...their part# 201-252

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I've never used any glasses while forge welding,but this thread got me thinking....so I checked out the Rio Grande catolog and they have a green #3 with IR protection for $11.50 a pair.. seems like a bargin...their part# 201-252

 

 

Found this place.

http://www.mountainglassarts.com/s.nl/sc.2/category.92/.f

 

Would something like this be strong enough for good protection for a bladesmith?

http://www.mountainglassarts.com/s.nl;jses...amp;category=92

 

From the quote on the first page "While the bright sodium flare may seem to pose the greatest risk it only causes temporary discomfort from overexposure. It is the UV and infra-red wavelengths that will cause permanent eye damage. You may be surprised to learn it is the molten glass itself that produces these wavelengths."

it seems as though the glass itself causes issues that require darker shades?

Is it only glass or would the steel make similar issues.

Also how does these glasses affect the color of the steels?

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As I said somewhere else in this thread, no, you do NOT need glassblower's glasses, be they didymium, this ACE stuff, or whatever. Steel does not and cannot produce the sodium flare that glass does, unless of course you start blowing glass in your forge. ;)

 

Some folks say the tint of the Didymium (or however you spell it) helps them see inside the forge better, but it's just the tint, it has nothing whatsoever to do with the sodium-flare wavelength.

 

Clear UV/IR protective lenses are much cheaper and have no effect on your color perception. If you just can't keep from staring mezmerized into the forge, then by all means get a pair of shade 3 (light green) cutting torch glasses to wear while you do that. UV and especially IR are the big dangers around hot work. Too much IR in your eyes can cook the eyeballs from the inside out, plus it can cause cataracts. Tinting only allows you to see when you would otherwise be blinded by the brightness, think cutting torches, gas welding, and arc welding. Very light tinting can improve visual contrast, like the light yellow tint of shooting glasses or the light brownish tint of driving glasses, and this is the purpose behind those glassblower glasses: they block the wavelength of sodium flare so the glassblower can see the molten glass clearly. The tint does not protect against UV or IR, the other lens material or a transparent coating does that. I had a long talk with my optometrist about this a couple of years ago when I needed new glasses, that's how I found out this stuff.

 

Protection against flying scale, etc. is the real reason for wearing safety glasses while forging. There's no need for protective tinting as long as you're like normal people (I know, I'm one to talk about normal... :lol: ) and don't just stare into the forge. Glance in to check the temp, look away. While I did have a flip-down shade 5 lens on my safety goggles, I took it off because it just gets in the way and makes me look like a giant moth. :lol:

 

Think impact protection first, followed by UV/IR protection, and if you like a contrast-improving tint after that, by all means go for it! B) (deliberate smilie-pun! :) )

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We all need goggles like Ulrich Hennicke... Don't even have to wear them on your eyes, just the sheer awesomeness of them on your head will protect you from any UV/IR :P

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I know I'm just a Newbie but from what I have been told and read, UV radiation is Not generated until the temperature (of anything) gets to about (2,482 C) or (4,500 F). Propane-oxygen flame is only about (2,093 C) or (3,800 F), so no UV radiation is generated.

 

Its the IR which is the concern.

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I bought my didymium glasses from wales apparatus. I also got number 5 half flip up glasses also from them. They are a little pricey but they don't seem to differ with the colors when looking at the forge.

 

Timothy

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I bought didymium glasses first, then looked at the spectral absorption/transmission charts later: oops. From what I can tell, didymium does not block IR.

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I've been using these for twenty years or so. Egads. Anyway, the welder's shade #3 is fine except that it's too dark for me in my shop to simply wear all the time. I wanted glasses I could put on and forget about, so they stay on. This company makes a special lens that filters more specifically UV & IR and allows more ambient light in. I never feel the need to take them off or look over them. They just stay on. I have the 2.5 AUR-99.

For unrelated reasons, I have exciting eyeballs, and they are regularly checked for exciting issues. No effects from all these years of forge work, and looking into the forge very regularly, so they have clearly done a very good job.

http://www.auralens.net/en/aur-99-filter

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Honostly shade 10 is more then overkill. It just wouldn't be all that effective for forgeing. I would recommend a shade 3-4, because you get a brighter flame with an oxy/fuel neutral flame then I have ever seen with forge welding. I would really use some of the recommendations from the previous comments. Good luck, 

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For those that are looking for a shade 3 IR lens that still allows you to see true colors, consider this option.  UVEX Instinct #S2825XP

 

Quote

Uvex (SCT) Spectrum Control Technology® Lens Tints are specifically designed to minimize the effects of exposure to Ultraviolet (UV) radiation, protecting workers from potential injury such as temporary or even permanent eye damage or blindness. Uvex Instinct SCT-Gray lenses filter 99.9% of UV radiation, 93% of blue light hazard and 85% of IR Radiation, while providing true color recognition, allowing workers to easily distinguish wire colors and other fine detail.

 

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Do they make that in a shade 2?  Sounds about perfect!

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