Jump to content
Svet

Making your own sand paper belt for the belt grinder

Recommended Posts

Allright, after serious consideration, I decided to buy this belt grinder:

rd-bg05.jpg

Didn't have any other choice anyway.

 

Its speed is 15 meters per second and that's 900 meters per minute. It is really fast minding that most professional grinders go at 350-400 meters per minute tops.

 

There are several problems with this little grinder, though.

1. It is underpowered - the motor is only 250 Watts (1/3 HP)

2. Its belt is only 24'' long.

3. It is made in China.

4. And last but not least - seems that there are no replacement belts for these grinders on the marked. Well, the woman at the store gave me a dumb look when I asked her about the belts, she knew nothing of their existence and she was almost sure that they are not being imported.

WTF, there is no chance getting belts for the only stationary belt grinder offered here?!

 

So, I thought of buying this toy and making my own belts for it out of sand paper sheets by cutting them to size in strips and sticking the ends together. Is it even possible? Will those DIY belts behave OK? Anyone done that before?

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Ric.

I'd love to buy some belts from those guys, but I don't live in the USA and the shipping & handling costs plus the local VAT and the customs taxes would make such a purchase quite unreasonable.

 

So no DIY stuff, huh?

No tutorials, no nothing? cry.gif

I searched the hell out of Google but I came up with nothing that could be of any use.

Guess i will have to try it on my own and see what happens...

 

By the way, I have a question: I noticed that some belt grinders use a well polished main wheel

(don't know what it's called in English) while others have a rubber coated one.

Does it mean that the ones with a polished steel wheel are meant to be used with grinding belts that are rubber coated on their interior side? :wacko::wacko::wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Uncoated wheels are not the best as a grinding surface, every little bump in the belt appears on your work and it shortens the life of the belt. Rubber wheels cut faster and more smoothly, and serrated (notched) rubber wheels cut even faster. I do mostly flat grinds with my KMG, and that involves the flat platen with a piece of pyroceram plate on top. That stuff really helps smooth the grind too.

 

Have you asked Darrin Ellis if he ships to Bulgaria?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Uncoated wheels are not the best as a grinding surface, every little bump in the belt appears on your work and it shortens the life of the belt. Rubber wheels cut faster and more smoothly, and serrated (notched) rubber wheels cut even faster. I do mostly flat grinds with my KMG, and that involves the flat platen with a piece of pyroceram plate on top. That stuff really helps smooth the grind too.

 

Have you asked Darrin Ellis if he ships to Bulgaria?

Thanks, Alan.

I won't do any hollow grinding with the toy, just flat grinds, so my only cencern is if the un-coated wheel would be "sticky" enough to actually keep the belt spinning. Or maybe the belt grinders using un-coated whells require a rubber coated belt? Such a belt won't be asy to make at home.

 

I don't know who Darrin Ellis is but if he can ship the belts without an invoice and pricing info included with the package, I could bypass the VAT and the customs taxes.

 

But let's buy the toy first and see if it is worth the ado. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, a plain steel wheel has enough traction to spin the belt. Rubber wheels are only for grinding, so no worries there.

 

Darrin is a supplier who is listed on a sticky under the "Tools and supplies" section of this forum, down at the bottom of the page. His website is www.elliscustomknifeworks.com, and I'd bet he can ship without an invoice. Customs forms are another matter, so the dreaded VAT may still be in effect. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again.

Maybe I could talk to Darrin Ellis and ask him to ship the package like an ordinary person-to-person parcel.

The VAT is 20% here and it applies to the value of the item plus the price of the shipping. This is really dreadful.

There is a company here that makes belts for industrial belt grinders but their shortest one is 3-4 meters, I think. :(

Jesus, belt grinders are really not popular in custom shops around here.

People have mills and all kinds of lathes and heavy equipment, all kinds of bench grinders and drills but no one cares about belt grinders. This is really strange. :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the metal wheel slips, I've found you can cut up a tire inner tube to make a 2 x 8 inch (or whatever size you need) rubber band 'tire' to give the wheel a bit more grip. I used one on a hard plastic wheel on my old grinder, I had to stick it on with contact cement (very slippery plastic wheel) but after that it worked quite well.

 

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the metal wheel slips, I've found you can cut up a tire inner tube to make a 2 x 8 inch (or whatever size you need) rubber band 'tire' to give the wheel a bit more grip. I used one on a hard plastic wheel on my old grinder, I had to stick it on with contact cement (very slippery plastic wheel) but after that it worked quite well.

 

Michael

Thanks Michael,

I thought of just using liquid latex if the wheel doesn't stick too well (and I suspect that it won't). The latex turns into rubber when it is dried.

I think I will apply the thing to the steel wheel and then manually spin the axis of the grinder real slow while holding a spatula towards the freshly coated wheel that would remove the excess latex and even out its surface.

The latex (or whatever its name is in English, we call it "silicon" here) looks like this:

 

5_2_1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah yep Silicone is the usual name here.

When you were saying latex I was bringing up in mind those dip in cans where you dip a hammerhandle or something, and when it comes out and dries it's got a rubbery coating on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a very similar belt grinder, and I suggest you to don't buy it (I'm sorry if I'm too late). Mine is exactly the same, but the brand name is Einhell.

It is too fast and not enaught powerful for this kind of work, so it is suitable only for rought grinding before heat treatment.

Anyway in my area is pretty easy to find new belts; if you want I can order some belts and send to you, even if I don't know how much you would pay of shipping costs. If you want to make your own belts, I don't think that silicone is strong enaught.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a very similar belt grinder, and I suggest you to don't buy it (I'm sorry if I'm too late). Mine is exactly the same, but the brand name is Einhell.

It is too fast and not enaught powerful for this kind of work, so it is suitable only for rought grinding before heat treatment.

Anyway in my area is pretty easy to find new belts; if you want I can order some belts and send to you, even if I don't know how much you would pay of shipping costs. If you want to make your own belts, I don't think that silicone is strong enaught.

 

Thank you for your repply, Giuseppe.

The silicone is for covering of the polished steel leading wheel of the grinder. Only in case that the belt slips over its surface.

 

This grinder is from a really low-quality series of tools.

Your "Einhell" is from the same manufacturer - just the label is different.

They are all manufactured in China, in the same factory, by the same crew. After those guys make them, they ransack the batch and do some testing. The ones that didn't turn out that good and had small defects get a "Budget" or "Agoyoma" labels and head for the East European market. The better quality ones get an "Einhel" label. They also go to the East European market but at a higher price.

Those Chinese guys sell absolutely the same piece of trash with a different, German-sounding label (like "Einhell") and a new, much higher price, of course.

Isn't it an awesome way to sell your junk to stupid East Europeans? B)

 

By the way, I did some calculations and it turned out that this little grinder's belt speed is 900 meters per minute!

You say that it is too fast.

Hmmmm... is that a problem?

I mean, I don't know anything about belt grinders and I thought that the higher the speed, the better it will eat metal and the longer the belts wil stay sharp. At least this is the principle when we are talking about angle grinders - the lower speed ones cut slower and wear their disks off much quicker.

 

Please, share your experience with your Einhell grinder. Is it capable of applying bevels on blades? Is it OK for stock removal in general? Do its belts wear too quickly? Is it OK for finishing blades, at least? Etc...

 

Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The silicone is for covering of the polished steel leading wheel of the grinder. Only in case that the belt slips over its surface.

Ok, I misunderstood. I thought you wanted to use it as glue for the homemade belts. Anyway I don't think that you have to use it; also the smooth side of the belt would erase very quikly the silicone layer. I use it as it is.

 

Those Chinese guys sell absolutely the same piece of trash with a different, German-sounding label (like "Einhell") and a new, much higher price, of course.

Isn't it an awesome way to sell your junk to stupid East Europeans?

Chinese guys are cunning (like us Italian guys when we were still poor, 60yrs ago) :lol: .

 

The grinder is too fast and yes, it is a problem. The highter the speed, the faster it will heat metal, so useless after HT. Sure, it will eat fast a lot of metal, but this isn't what we want. You need a big amount of precision to make good bevels and all the stuff related with knifemaking, and this belt grinder run really too fast.

The grit of the belts runs from 80 to 120, so pretty useless for finishing. I use it mostly for convex ground knives, since in this way it doesn't scratch too deeply and leaves a nice finish. It is very good also to resharpen very dull edges, once you learn how to don't overheat stuff.

Belts works well for long time.

ciao

Giuseppe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharing your experience with these Chinese toys, Guiseppe.

 

I learned from a thread on another forum that all it takes to make your own belt is buy a roll of paper-backed sand paper belt, use a grinding stone to clean the grit at the two ends and glue them together using PVA adhesive. Just the way I imagined it. :)

The guy makes his own belts and it is amazing that his paper belts do not tear apart.

Cool!

HERE is the thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are welcome Svet.

Very interesting thread, thanks for showing us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There really arent any other options? I don't think paper will hold up. I would start with cloth, glue paper to that, then add the abrasive and adhesdive material. I don't know where you are going to get powdered silicon carbide if you can't find belts.

 

if you want something to grind after heat treat, you should use a water cooled grinding wheel:

http://www.museumtrail.org/images/Saguache...indingWheel.jpg

 

A big home-made grinding wheel will keep you much happier than a cheap chinese belt grinder that you can't get belts for. A big stone probably wont wear out in your lifetime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

toxonix, you don't need to buy silicon carbide i.e. you don't need to make the sandpaper.

Just buy a roll of it and cut a belt out of it.

Silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, whatever kind of sand paper you need for your job.

I thought of reinforcing the paper belt with cloth too but then I saw this guy's thread and realized that I don't need the reinforcement. That's really cool because it saves time and effort and shortens the whole belt making process down to 5 minutes of cutting and gluing.

 

About the stone wheel: I like stones but I don't like stone-age equipment. :D

Just a joke.

I've seen local artisans use stone wheels. Heard that those stones do a fantastic job as sharpeers.

Japanese stones are a better option for finishing, though. Hand rubbing is the ultimate way to go, after all. :lol:

Edited by Svet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...