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Dear gents

 

I have forged a (to my mind) fine viking style axe head .

The body is mild steel and to this is welded cs70 15n20 twisted patternwelded edge.whils asthetically I like it I was wondering wether you have seen examples of this edge method on axes and wether it would be robust enough for chopping etc .

I made sure that the edge was welded to a curved body so as to prevent an obvious line of stress .I have hammers that have the face welded on and an anvil all have suffered decades of abuse .so what do you all recon .

 

 

.sml_patten_welded_viking.jpg

 

I know the obvious answer is to beat it against as much knotted wood as posseble but this one stays clean (Ill probably make the next one as a keeper to abuse)

\

I would apreciate any ideas- critique

thanks Owen

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That is super cool. What are the dimensions?

 

 

Dimentions are 4 1/2 inches of edge eight inches along top .eye hole is somewhere between big hammer and small sledge Ta

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Thanks for your comments,

 

this one is being kept as a display piece in order to generate sales I will however be making more ( I usually like to make a few of something before I settle on a price and the next couple should be better and quicker) .I punched this one by hand and I recon that this is a perfect job for the press .

 

the body is forged from 1 1/2" by1 1/4 " .next time ill use 2" to get a bit of depth into the luggs and blade I am aiming for a bigger blade .

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I like it very much. It has a very fine shape.

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Now that's a fine axe! :You_Rock_Emoticon: :35: I have never seen an original with a pattern-welded edge, but who knows? They could exist. There are pattern-welded spearheads, after all, why not an axe?

 

Excellent proportions on that head, by the way. How long a haft are you gonna put on it?

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Owen, the method you used in putting this together is very old. There are some examples of work similar to this in spirit in Tylcotes works on Anglo-Saxon age weapons and tools, as well as being referenced by Jim Hrisoulas in "Master Bladesmith". This is a lovely piece, on its own as well as in context.

Cheers

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The method of welding a bit of steel onto a body of iron is an authentic axe process, but I've never seen any evidence of using a twisted bar for the edge. I'm not too familiar with the Anglo-Saxon artifacts, though.

It looks damn good, though - if them Vikings didn't do it, it was their loss!

Nice axe!

:35:

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Aesthetically I find it very pleasing.

 

Is the edge welded on to the body or in the body? If the prior, I wonder if the differential hardness of the two steels could cause the axe to fail at the relatively thin seam. I don't know the answer, but intuitively I would think that the difference between the way the mild steel body and the hard edge react to impact shock would stress a thin weld seam. Perhaps that stress could be mitigated if the edge were welded deeper into the axe body - sort of sandwiched in between two outer layers of mild steel in order to increase the welded surface and distribute stess over a broader area - similar to the way in which it was done in the past...

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Wulf, your thought make sense but I have seen a lot of heavy duty ancient tools made in this way, and I own an adze and a BIG axe made with a hard carbon steel bit welded ON to the wrought iron body. It is very common to see old tools made with a soft body and the hard edge welded on a side, expecially on agricultural and woodworking tools that are sharpened only on one side (sorry for the poor english...). I think that if the weld is made correctly the tool made in this way can work with no problem.

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Aesthetically I find it very pleasing.

 

Is the edge welded on to the body or in the body? If the prior, I wonder if the differential hardness of the two steels could cause the axe to fail at the relatively thin seam. I don't know the answer, but intuitively I would think that the difference between the way the mild steel body and the hard edge react to impact shock would stress a thin weld seam. Perhaps that stress could be mitigated if the edge were welded deeper into the axe body - sort of sandwiched in between two outer layers of mild steel in order to increase the welded surface and distribute stess over a broader area - similar to the way in which it was done in the past...

 

I have made many axes in the way that you describe by folding the wrought iron around a hard steel centre and this is indeed a good way to make em ,

 

the axe that I have pictured has the edge butwelded (forgewelded ) to the edge.this is a method used in viking swords and some large seaxes also in many contemporary mosaic blades .theotetically you should end up with an aspect of cushioning as the mild steel body would back up the edge and help relieve its edge stress.forge welding if done well should be as strong as the parent material ,the potential weakness for this method sould be in shear as if you cut into a log and then tryed to bend blade sideways potentially you would be acting with leverage at the weld boundary .I curved the edge body boundary to prevent this and stop there being a single line of potential weakness .

As has been mentioned forge welding is a traditional method for atatching carbnon steel to a wrought body it is an old and proven method however its only as good as the smiths welding .I had a forging hammer that was verry old and used as my primary hammer and it was made in this method .after I had used it for 5 years heavy forging the edge came off ( there was a curved nail in the middle of face i guess to hold it to the body as it was welded ).so this method is not infalable but that hammer had a long long life before its death and died happy .I apreciate your questioning as this was the reason for the post . Ta

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  • 2 months later...

A friend axed for something similar a couple of months ago (sorry, had to put in the pun :P ) I was going to do a wrought body with a 1095 bit but now I'm inspired to try a damasc bit. That's some very nice work!

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