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John Smith

I want to see your Hamon

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Nice one Theodore. That J.White recipe works like a charm every time. 

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A couple of paring knives right out of the temper oven and a santokuish style knife. All three are 1095 steel. I used satanite to produce the hamon and quenched in McMaster fast quench oil heated to around 150°F

20190218_132451.jpg

20190131_222545.jpg

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Here is one of mine that I am really happy with. it is really hard to photograph though, but a bit of low winter sunlight seem to do the trick.

DSC_0050.JPG

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16 hours ago, Pieter-Paul Derks said:

Here is one of mine that I am really happy with. it is really hard to photograph though, but a bit of low winter sunlight seem to do the trick.

DSC_0050.JPG

Very nice, love the bolster. Good clean line, what did you use to produce the hamon?

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On 2/21/2019 at 2:31 AM, michael cross said:

Very nice, love the bolster. Good clean line, what did you use to produce the hamon?

Thanks! I am having a lot of fun with fabricated bolsters lately.

The blade is 1.1274 steel, the european equivalent of 1095.

I used watered down refractory glue (the kind that comes in a sealant tube), I do a thin wash over the whole blade to protect it from carburisation in my electric kiln. I actually do that on all my blades, even without hamon.

The ''waves'' of the hamon are painted on with the same stuff, only less watered down

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A customer who commissioned a pair of kitchen knives insisted in having a hamon on the bigger one, so here it is. I am looking for pointers to get the best possible definition with what I currently got on hand. Wet/dry up to #1500, ferric chloride, hard back and foam back. 

So far it's up to #1000 and no etch yet. Don't mind the j hooks :lol:. Should I begin etching now? Should I use a soft back from here to help create topography? Should I get finer paper?

 

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What are some steels that produce a really good Hamon? Preferably steels that a noobie could heat treat without a problem..

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17 minutes ago, Conner Michaux said:

What are some steels that produce a really good Hamon? Preferably steels that a noobie could heat treat without a problem..

True 1075(not admiral 1075/1080), 1095, W1, W2 and the Japanese White. Of those easily available in North America, Aldo's W2 give the best hamons. 

That being said, you need either luck, a good HT setup with a thermocouple or excellent eye balling of decalescence. Preferably a mix of it all. It's also preferable to use an accelerated quench oil or water/oil interrupted quench to get more activity. Also, the lower the austenizing temp, the more activity you get but it's also easier to screw up. 

That's what I've learned about this wizardry to far :lol:.

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2 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

True 1075(not admiral 1075/1080), 1095, W1, W2 and the Japanese White. Of those easily available in North America, Aldo's W2 give the best hamons. 

That being said, you need either luck, a good HT setup with a thermocouple or excellent eye balling of decalescence. Preferably a mix of it all. It's also preferable to use an accelerated quench oil or water/oil interrupted quench to get more activity. Also, the lower the austenizing temp, the more activity you get but it's also easier to screw up. 

That's what I've learned about this wizardry to far :lol:.

Wizardry indeed...:huh:

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4 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

A customer who commissioned a pair of kitchen knives insisted in having a hamon on the bigger one, so here it is. I am looking for pointers to get the best possible definition with what I currently got on hand. Wet/dry up to #1500, ferric chloride, hard back and foam back. 

So far it's up to #1000 and no etch yet. Don't mind the j hooks :lol:. Should I begin etching now? Should I use a soft back from here to help create topography? Should I get finer paper?

 

My method for bringing out hamon is to bring it to 2000-2500 and etch lightly in diluted ferric, then under running water you can wet sand with 3000 grit paper or anything that will very gently remove the oxides. I use 3K silicon carbide powder now to do this instead. If you are going to do a lot of hamon I would say definitely get some of the fine powder and use it like finger stones with light oil and a cotton pad for backing. 

This helps to whiten the hamon and show any other activities in the steel in the case of bloom/pattern weld. 

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@Emiliano Carrillo thank you sir! I'll see what I can find. I am in Canada and I've had difficulty sourcing such materials so far. If I can't find powder, would a foam pad and 2500 paper with locally applied pressure on the nioi/ashi/yô somehow help whiten it up? 

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6 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

@Emiliano Carrillo thank you sir! I'll see what I can find. I am in Canada and I've had difficulty sourcing such materials so far. If I can't find powder, would a foam pad and 2500 paper with locally applied pressure on the nioi/ashi/yô somehow help whiten it up? 

That should help! Search Amazon and eBay, that's where I have had the best luck, never found any locally! 

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Here's what the first dip in ferric revealed. I believe it will be worth experimenting. It is by far the most activity I've had in a hamon, well, of the 4 I've made...:lol:

Edit: ok, I think I've got this hamon thing almost figured out. I did a short dip in ferric and gently removed the oxydes with 1500 paper I had previously worn out against itself, because I had no 3000 in stock. I think it worked! Thanks again!

Here's the result:

Re edit: YouTube links seem broken...

IMG_20190225_201405.jpg

Edited by Joël Mercier
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