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John Smith

I want to see your Hamon

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On carbon steel type 1095, but without some of the impurities

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at last count the blades polished just 100 grains of abrasive

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Very nice Lamey. I'm guessing these are W2? love the crooked heart boshi on the first one.

Edited by jake cleland

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oh - the little fish made me laugh out loud! good sense of humor!

 

The hamons are great, guys. I hope to have one to join in the fun again, very soon.

 

take care all,

kc

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Thanks Roger.

 

Here's some of a recent hamon I got from Parks50 and W2. This one is only polished up to 800x so I could only imagine what more I could get out of it with a little more work.

 

IMG_4385.jpg

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Rather spontaneous hamon, No clay coat when this one formed

 

415397_684945628159_184806155_34215144_561569457_o.jpg

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Here is one that I think belongs here. I have had nothing but outstanding luck with mixing w2 and low manganese 1075. Either alone give wonderful hamons, and together the interplay of the hamon and the layers is just beautiful. I don't mean to "toot my own horn." this is by far the best looking thing I have ever made. The second best came from the same mix of steel. It seems to be a cool way to get a subtle pattern and a hamon to imitate the traditional blades from Asia (though this is a German style blade).

 

Hope you like. thanks for looking.

 

Kevin

 

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Steel cable blade with a wrought iron guard and elk tine handle

Bowie.jpg

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Hi,

I'm new here. First I would like to apologize for my English. Perhaps the Google translator to help me.

I make Japanese swords. I use modern steel and oroshigane own product. I will try to put some photos here. Prefer hardening style Ichimonji where not paste. Otherwise, often creating hamon style osafune Bizen, Midar chóji. I'm here to try to upload the photos.

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hada-oroshigane.jpg

katana hada 3.jpg

oroshi katana H.jpg

tanto.oroshi1..jpg

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further demonstration Utsuri on my work. Utsuri occurs frequently on my blades. But this effect is difficult to shoot

utsuri.jpg

tanto takeda 2.jpg

ayasugi.jpg

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My Accidental Hamon.

 

I didn't set out to have a hamon. I've never even tried before. I didn't use any clay. I hardened & tempered in a very mundane way (McMaster-Carr Fastquench). The steel is 1075 form the NJ Steel Baron. When I got down to 400 grit I noticed what seemed to be a hamon. I showed it to Dereck & Nick at NESM and they confirmed it was a hamon, and advised me to etch it. I did, and here's the result:

 

AccidentalHamon3.jpg

 

Doesn't look as nice & sharp as the hamon people actually set out to make, but hey - it was free smile.gif

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Truly facinating. I have gotten a couple hamons to show, but am unclear about what type of clay to use.

 

Is there something specific that you favor for clay? Why?

 

Do different clays have an influence on the development of the hamon?

 

I have used redneck clay from soft fire bricks. I crumble it up and then crush with a hammer - add a bit of water and then coat the back of the blade.

 

Thanks for your insight.

 

John

 

Double Y Design

 

Laurel, MT

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Truly facinating. I have gotten a couple hamons to show, but am unclear about what type of clay to use.

 

Is there something specific that you favor for clay? Why?

 

Do different clays have an influence on the development of the hamon?

 

I have used redneck clay from soft fire bricks. I crumble it up and then crush with a hammer - add a bit of water and then coat the back of the blade.

 

Thanks for your insight.

 

John

 

Double Y Design

 

Laurel, MT

 

 

 

I use furnace cement.Just add a bit more water to it to make a slurry with it.Coat the blade.

Edited by Hotanvil

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Truly facinating. I have gotten a couple hamons to show, but am unclear about what type of clay to use.

 

Is there something specific that you favor for clay? Why?

 

Do different clays have an influence on the development of the hamon?

 

I have used redneck clay from soft fire bricks. I crumble it up and then crush with a hammer - add a bit of water and then coat the back of the blade.

 

Thanks for your insight.

 

John

 

Double Y Design

 

Laurel, MT

 

 

there are many threads dedicated to the specifics of clay and its use in creating hamon's...without falling too far down the rabbit hole on this subject, i would suggest several things...1) use a search for "hamon clay" or "clay hamon" becausse there is too much information on the subject to go over in a single post...2) before getting into trying to create a personalized clay recipe you may want to use furnace cement or the like...the 2 most popular are satanite and rutlands...this will give you an idea of what to expect and a base to work from...the fact is, many many great makers do not have a secret recipe...they just use straight up satanite or rutlands, and the hamon's come out beautifull...that is by far the best place to start imo...once you get the hang of it a bit, then you can start exprimenting with recipes if you wish...

 

really, in its simplest form, you need a substance (clay) that will stick to the blade and be able to stay stuck for atleast the first part of the quench (without cracking and all that good stuff)...it may help to think in terms of not just "insulating" and start thinking in terms of "preventing"...the main purpose of clay in this application is to "prevent" parts of the blade from being able to harden quickly...i hope that made even a little sense...if you really are interested you can pm me and i can point you towards a couple links that would be of great help so we dont have to clutter this thread or drag up old ones.

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Modern steel that can create beautiful hamon do not need a special paste. Just paste any, that the blade holds the heat.

,, secret "recipes have meaning only for conventional steels. clay layer is very thin, about 2mm. But traditionally made of steel react quite differently to quenching than modern steel

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