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I want to see your Hamon


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pavel and stuart - i really enjoyed seeing your blades.

kevin

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My latest, a W1 integral. I've been really enjoying the process of producing a hamon, and refining my technique aiming for better results each time.

Hi guys, lovely thread.   Heres one of my favourite hamons I made a few months back.    Steel is 125SC.   Jelle

I did this tanto a very long time, from the same steel

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DIdnt go back far enough, but I'm gonna move the handle forward a bit to meet it. Just cleaned it off and a quick etch to see..

 

 

 

1095? looks like there's a ton of stuff to bring out in there - i'd recommend a lemon juice etch.

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im guessing more like 1075 just to be different from Jake...he is rght about one thing, it looks like a very pretty hamon with a bunch of activity is hidden in there somewhere...if you can already see a bunch of stuff going on this early in the polishing, i really can't wait to see when it i finished...

 

on a side note about it the hamon dropping off too early...ive had this happen to me because i was rushing things a bit and the tang area wasnt up to heat (lesson learned)...i also choose to not re-HT beacuse the hammon i got i was very pleased with, other than the fact it dropped off about 1/4 inch too soon...an idea would be to fit the blade with a collar...an unconventional modified habaki-ish like object would hide most of the edge that didnt harden...you could also just move the notches up on the blade.

 

seriously though...please keep us updated as to how this turns out...im very curious.

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1095? looks like there's a ton of stuff to bring out in there - i'd recommend a lemon juice etch.

 

 

im guessing more like 1075 just to be different from Jake...he is rght about one thing, it looks like a very pretty hamon with a bunch of activity is hidden in there somewhere...if you can already see a bunch of stuff going on this early in the polishing, i really can't wait to see when it i finished...

 

 

I forged the blade out of a worn out Nicholson file, they really do make some nice hamons. w1 I think?

 

on a side note about it the hamon dropping off too early...ive had this happen to me because i was rushing things a bit and the tang area wasnt up to heat (lesson learned)...i also choose to not re-HT beacuse the hammon i got i was very pleased with, other than the fact it dropped off about 1/4 inch too soon...an idea would be to fit the blade with a collar...an unconventional modified habaki-ish like object would hide most of the edge that didnt harden...you could also just move the notches up on the blade.

 

seriously though...please keep us updated as to how this turns out...im very curious.

 

BIG lessoned learned on even heating as you said. Great suggestion on using a habaki like thing to hide it. I grabbed some lemon juice earlier, gonna have a go at it once I have it at 1000 grit.

 

Thanks for the responses guys, I will post some more pics when its polished up.

 

Heres another from a file..crashing waves or hillside scene? Terrible cell phone pics, sorry.

 

hamon2.jpg

hamon3-1.jpg

Edited by B_Rogers
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hey, there is a lot of activity there. You could etch that several times with vinegar and then knock them off with pumice.Use MOther's mag and aluminum polish above the hamon and FF pumice below. Rub the heck out of it. Dry. there is a ton of neat stuff in that hamon. great job.

kc

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hey, there is a lot of activity there. You could etch that several times with vinegar and then knock them off with pumice.Use MOther's mag and aluminum polish above the hamon and FF pumice below. Rub the heck out of it. Dry. there is a ton of neat stuff in that hamon. great job.

kc

 

Heres the other side, polished to 1000 and a few lemon juice etches. Very hard to capture all the little wisps and shadows on camera. I don't have any pumice or powdered abrasives, anybody know of a good source? egay?

IMG_6354.jpg

IMG_6354-1.jpg

Edited by B_Rogers
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Thanks Kevin & Salem for all your advice/tips on producing a hamon. Salem really went out of his way trying to help me procuce a hamon, but I wasn't understanding the procedure. I quit w/the hamon for nearly one year, but finally switched to another quenching oil & following Salem's tutorial I'm making good progress. I can't make the test blades fast enough! Bill........

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I figured i should show the knife i posted a few pages back now that it is finished.

MDWoodCollage.jpg

And here is one from a 240mm Gyuto i did

2011-10-17_16-11-18_965.jpg

I think i am on the right track, as those are my first two hamon's :D

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pavel and stuart - i really enjoyed seeing your blades.

kevin

 

 

Thanks Kevin. Here's another recent one. It is much more refined and balanced than that last one I posted. Still experimenting and need to work on the boshi area but overall I like this.

 

Kwaiken6.jpg

Edited by SBranson
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Mr Podstawa, first i would like to welcome you to the forums.

 

about the blade and hamon...it's very pretty...no, i take that back...it's beautiful...would you mind giving any details about your process...steel type? clay type? quench medium? polishing process? etc. etc.

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Mr Podstawa, first i would like to welcome you to the forums.

 

about the blade and hamon...it's very pretty...no, i take that back...it's beautiful...would you mind giving any details about your process...steel type? clay type? quench medium? polishing process? etc. etc.

 

 

I agree, just beautiful.

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it is a steel W1, W2, and the first picture in 1075

I always put out the water, hybrid polishing

I use a sealant to fireplaces with heat-resistant cement

 

thank you for your opinions and I am glad that I'm in this forum

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B_Rogers - that is beautiful. These things are as able to grab me as the best pattern welding. So haunting and amorphose. Clounds in steel.

 

You can get FF pumice from Amazon.

 

Just the etching did a great bit, didn't it? It is amazing what lemon juice or vinegar will do compared to ferric chloride.

 

S Branson, - wow, that is cool.

 

Bill - once you get close it becomes easy. It just takes attention to what you are doing so you can refine your own process and learn what to do to emphasize various properties after you get the base polish done.

 

Przemek - WELCOME! You are surely a student of bladesmithing with many hours of practice and study. Those hamons are breathtaking. I never get tired of seeing blades like that. Would you care to share any of the process, especially polishing, that you used to achieve those results? One of the things that have helped a number of us is comparing notes with various ways to highlight or emphasize the hamon after heat treatment.

 

thanks for sharing,

Kevin

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Przmek - if you are interested, Aldo Bruno, who is a member of this forum, sells a low manganese 1075 steel. It is perfect for swords with hamons. It is actually so low in manganese that it technically should not be called 1075 but instead water-hardening high carbon (whc) steel. Everyone just calls it low manganese or low mang 1075, though. It forges very easily, and is as simple as possible to heat treat. It forms hamons that are as good as, if not better than, w2 (aldo sells w2, also). It is easier to heat treat than w2, somewhat less edge holding, somewhat more shock resist. Beautiful hamons, simple and responsive to heat treatment. I only mention this because you have a 1075 blade posted. This alloy would respond just like your 1075, but be even easier to get hamons.

 

I mix w2 and the low manganese 1075 in pattern welding all of the time to get good hamons and subtle grain structure to mimic historical steel patterns with modern steel quality and performance.

 

take care,

Kevin

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B_Rogers - that is beautiful. These things are as able to grab me as the best pattern welding. So haunting and amorphose. Clounds in steel.

 

You can get FF pumice from Amazon.

 

Just the etching did a great bit, didn't it? It is amazing what lemon juice or vinegar will do compared to ferric chloride.

 

S Branson, - wow, that is cool.

 

Bill - once you get close it becomes easy. It just takes attention to what you are doing so you can refine your own process and learn what to do to emphasize various properties after you get the base polish done.

 

Przemek - WELCOME! You are surely a student of bladesmithing with many hours of practice and study. Those hamons are breathtaking. I never get tired of seeing blades like that. Would you care to share any of the process, especially polishing, that you used to achieve those results? One of the things that have helped a number of us is comparing notes with various ways to highlight or emphasize the hamon after heat treatment.

 

thanks for sharing,

Kevin

 

 

Thank you, I'm but a newb so hopefully they will get better from here. Lemon juice seems to give me the best results without the whole blade turning into a black smutfest. Thank you all for the compliments and advice.

 

Brent

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you guys should stop posting all these pictures of hamon's . . . . its making me jealous <_<

GOOD JOB EVERYONE !!! they all look amazing ! :)

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One thing I could add is using a rubber sanding block(used for wet/dry sanding an auto paint job) for wet sanding a blade through the grits. I've read tutorials where knifemakers recommended using a piece of steel flatbar w/a piece of rubber glued to it as a backing for the sandpaper; the rubber block seems to work pretty well for me. I can't match Przemek or most of the others on this forum in producing a hamon, but maybe someone will benefit from using/trying one of these rubber blocks. Bill.........

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the ashi look a lot "wilder" towards the yip of the blade...is this an illusion? if its not, what did you do differentl with the clay towards the tip...very cool effect...looks like the hamon starts off "calm", and then becomes "chaotic" towards the tip...great job...even if it is an illusion...still great job...lol

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