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I want to see your Hamon


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john - I love that nagi man!

you do a better job than most at keeping the ridge lines really crisp in your work.

 

I have found that, for me, one way to do this is to use regular tool and die maker's stones for polishing along the ridges up through 400 grit and then switching to paper after that.

 

What do you do - waterstones? or do you do some hybrid with stones and paper?

 

beautiful. Hopefully, I will actually meet you at Fire and Brimstone!

 

kc

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My latest, a W1 integral. I've been really enjoying the process of producing a hamon, and refining my technique aiming for better results each time.

Hi guys, lovely thread.   Heres one of my favourite hamons I made a few months back.    Steel is 125SC.   Jelle

I did this tanto a very long time, from the same steel

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I will be there Kevin and we can talk about my techniques then. I will post what I do when I get home from tonight.

 

 

Some amazing hamons on your site sir, waiting eagerly for a little info on your process.

 

 

Brent

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here a couple small kives...the one with tsuka-maki is 1095 (kelly cupples) in water and is part of a matching set i made as a gift...the other one, which i am calling an "ameri-dashi" (american kiridashi) is w2 (aldo bruno) in water...

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those are both very nice. The hamon on the 1095 is among the best I have ever seen on that alloy. You got a batch of low manganese for sure, and did it justice. I like the very defined line between hamon and rest of knife (yakiba, maybe, in japanese). I can get that effect reliably (3 of 4 times, maybe better once I get my ht kiln set up) using low manganese 1075.

 

I get less obvious ashi when I polish to emphasize the yakiba. I need to learn a way to brighten the yakiba without obscuring the ashi so much. It may come down to selective polishing, I don't know.

kc

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thank you Kevin...you are right about the 1095...not my favorite steel for hamon...it took me quite a bit of experimentation before i finally found a process for 1095 that i am somewat happy with...still doesnt compare to what you can get with w2 though...heat has a lot to do with it too, and 1095 can be kinda picky when it comes to heat treat...

 

 

this is what i have noticed though...i have no scientific proof for this, and for all i know it all might just be in my mind, but it may be worth experimenting with to see if you get similair results...

 

what i have found, is that the type of etchant you use effects what kind of details are highlighted...in my experience, lemon juice really goes after the habuchi, and will end up leaving it very defined and white-ish...apple cider vinegar seems to etch the ashi more, but doesn't seem to do as good of a job on the habuchi as lemon juice, nor does it have as much of an effect as far as whitening goes...to solve this problem, i have adopted the use of several diff etchants...i don't mix them together though...for the first etch ill use lemon juice...then ill move onto apple cider vin for a few etches...then another lemon juice...ill repeat this process several times (until im satisfied with the result), with lemon juice always being the final etch (i swear it helps brighen the details brought out by the vinegar, but again, could be my imagination)...i also rub the crap out of it with powdered abrasives...

 

thanks again for the compliments...

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here is the hamon on the other blade in the set...the hamon falls off too soon...no reason for it other than i rushed it during the heat treat and towards the nakago was too cool...this blade was a dilema...i had a hamon that falls off too soon, but other than that i kinda liked it...it still pisses me off when i look at it. lol.

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Edited by Mike Fegan
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Mike, could you tell me how long(approx.)you etch w/the lemon juice & apple cider vinegar. Thanks for your time. Bill

 

well...that kinda depends on how the steel is reacting...some hamons seem to take to etching quicker/easier than others...i prefer short etches with mild acids because i think it gives a nicer, less harsh looking final result (just my personal taste)...i don't time the etching process, i just kinda go off of "feel" according to how te steel is reacting with the acid...its hard to get any exacting method because there are several factors that determine how the acid will react with the steel...now that i have that long winded psuedo-disclaimer out of the way, i would say about 5-7 minutes per etch...as to how many etches with vinegar vs lemon juice...that depends on how the steel is reacting to the etches, and the look i am trying to achieve...keep in mind the phrase "trying to achieve" is the final look i have in my mind vs what is happning in reality, and they almost never match up...i have learned that adapting, and being willing to change strategy midway through is a great asset...so, this may sound really goofy, but ive learned to go with the flow and let the steel decide what it wants to do, and the steps that should be taken...the one constant habbit i have adopted to fit with my taste is to make sure the final etch, or etches are with lemon juice...im always experimenting, so ask me the same question a year or two from now and i may be giving a different answer lol...hope that helped.

Edited by Mike Fegan
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something just occured to me...im using terms like "reacting" in a somewhat vague way, so i would like to elaborate on that a bit just to make it easier to understand...if you know all of this already, forgive me, but i would like to make it more understandable for those who may not...

 

so anyway, when you etch steel, oxides form and eventually the steel will turn almost black...i don't let it get quite to the "black" look...i stop somewhere around when it is grey...sometimes this happens faster or easier than other times, and sometimes the steel seems to react faster to the etching and for oxides more readily than other times...so when i say "it depends on how the steel is reacting" what i am really saying is "i stop when the steel turns a dark grey", which takes on average (with hot lemon juice/vinegar) in about 5-7 minutes...the oxides hide the etch, so you don't really know exactly what the etch did until you clean the oxides off...

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Thanks, Mike; I appreciate the information & will certainly try lemon juice as an etchant on the next blade. Bill.....

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

thank you very much for all

for welcoming me to the forum

Kevin is the science of polishing my hybrid polishing video Walter Sorrells

Two years ago he sent a video to Poland

so far my my quenching in water

there are cracks

 

willingly would buy steel from Aldo

but the cost of transport to the Poland would be very high

 

 

 

Mike very nice hamon

 

I will show it yet

 

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Edited by Przemek Podstawa
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very nice everyone...this is hands down my favorite thread...i get a lot of inspiration looking through it

 

quick question for stu...i can tell that the hamon must have followed your clay layout pretty closely...just wondering if you have a certain method you have developed to repeat this...and what grit that is polished up to...and what etch did you use...im guessing 600 grit and ferric...am i even close?

 

to preto...i love that checkered spacer...well...i loe the whole knife, but the spacer really gets my attention forsome reason.

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I don't do a lot of posting here, but this hamon thread has really got me going. I saw a Don Hanson knife about 5 years ago that got me chasing hamons. I started doing san mai knives because they looked like a hamon. Here is some of my actual hamons.

 

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well this forum is going to keep me very busy because the more I look at it the more cool things I want to try ... I am very new to Knife making (a couple months new) and so far out of all the forum posts I have read and the few books I have read I have figured out how to get metal very hot in a forge made out of a fire brick and a torch and I have been able to pound it into something resembling a knife with a 3lb hammer and a peice of railroad track for an anvil.. I have tried to do an oil quench on a couple blades and heat treated in a toaster oven and they seem to be ok (I have no real way to test hardness but they are sharp) Thank you to everyone on here that is willing to share their knowledge and experience with a beginner like me

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  • 5 weeks later...

Hi guys!

Ohh... there's a lot of great Hamon here, keep'em coming!

 

Here's a Bowie I'm working on, it's the first blade I've used Nugui on (just red ironoxide and peanut oil) it helped with the contrast a lot more than I thought it would.

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Marius

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